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Guest Editors' Introduction

Author

Listed:
  • Mary O'Sullivan
  • Margaret B. W. Graham

Abstract

There are already manifold interactions between business history and management studies but, to date, they have tended to be more particular and patchy than general and systematic. In this introduction we summarize the arguments that scholars from business history, management studies and social science have made for closer contact between these fields which emphasize the benefits to be gained both for theoretical and historical research on business. We highlight how the articles published in this Special Issue show the wide variety of intellectual purposes, approaches, and benefits that closer engagement between business history and management theories might entail. Yet, concerns have also been raised about the value of a closer alliance between business history and management studies and we suggest that they are worthy of further consideration and discussion. To that end, we propose a more deliberate conversation about what it is we do as historians and theorists of business and what we seek to accomplish. Such a discussion would help us not only to better understand the limits to fruitful integration but also how to work together more productively in the collaborations that seem most worthwhile. Copyright (c) 2010 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Society for the Advancement of Management Studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Mary O'Sullivan & Margaret B. W. Graham, 2010. "Guest Editors' Introduction," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 775-790, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jomstd:v:47:y:2010:i:s1:p:775-790
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Juha-Antti Lamberg & Kalle Pajunen, 2010. "Agency, Institutional Change, and Continuity: The Case of the Finnish Civil War," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 814-836, July.
    2. Marcelo Bucheli & Joseph T. Mahoney & Paul M. Vaaler, 2010. "Chandler's Living History: "The Visible Hand" of Vertical Integration in Nineteenth Century America Viewed Under a Twenty-First Century Transaction Costs Economics Lens," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 859-883, July.
    3. Ronald Coase, 2006. "The Conduct of Economics: The Example of Fisher Body and General Motors," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 255-278, June.
    4. McCraw, Thomas K., 2006. "Schumpeter's Business Cycles as Business History," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 80(02), pages 231-261, June.
    5. Pettigrew, Andrew M., 1997. "What is a processual analysis?," Scandinavian Journal of Management, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 337-348, December.
    6. Stephanie Decker, 2010. "Postcolonial Transitions in Africa: Decolonization in West Africa and Present Day South Africa," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 791-813, July.
    7. repec:cup:apsrev:v:94:y:2000:i:02:p:251-267_22 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Hannah, Leslie, 1983. "New Issues in British Business History," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(02), pages 165-174, June.
    9. Mark Jenkins, 2010. "Technological Discontinuities and Competitive Advantage: A Historical Perspective on Formula 1 Motor Racing 1950-2006," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 884-910, July.
    10. Whittington, Richard, 2008. "Alfred Chandler, Founder of Strategy: Lost Tradition and Renewed Inspiration," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 82(02), pages 267-277, June.
    11. McCraw, Thomas K., 2008. "Alfred Chandler: His Vision and Achievement," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 82(02), pages 207-226, June.
    12. James Reveley & Simon Ville, 2010. "Enhancing Industry Association Theory: A Comparative Business History Contribution," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 837-858, July.
    13. Alfred D. Chandler, 1992. "Organizational Capabilities and the Economic History of the Industrial Enterprise," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 79-100, Summer.
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