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Bid-Ask Spread Components in an Order-Driven Environment

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  • Brockman, Paul
  • Chung, Dennis Y

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to extend the bid-ask spread decomposition literature into the order-driven environment. The use of electronic limit order books combined with order-driven market making has been increasing rapidly in recent years because improvements in information technology and financial market deregulation. To date, reported bid-ask spread decompositions rely almost exclusively on quote-driven or hybrid systems. This study provides bid-ask spread component estimates from one of the world's largest order-driven markets, the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong. Based on a sample of over six million observations, we estimate a median adverse selection component of 33 percent and a median order processing component of 45 percent of the spread. Dollar volume-based decile portfolios show significant cross-sectional variation for adverse selection costs but insignificant variation for order processing costs. Finally, order persistence is consistently positive for all deciles and displays a direct relation with the level of trading activity.

Suggested Citation

  • Brockman, Paul & Chung, Dennis Y, 1999. "Bid-Ask Spread Components in an Order-Driven Environment," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 22(2), pages 227-246, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jfnres:v:22:y:1999:i:2:p:227-46
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    Cited by:

    1. Araújo, Gustavo Silva & Barbedo, Claudio Henrique da S. & Vicente, José Valentim M., 2014. "The adverse selection cost component of the spread of Brazilian stocks," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 21-41.
    2. Angelo Ranaldo, 2002. "Market Dynamics Around Public Information Arrivals," FAME Research Paper Series rp45, International Center for Financial Asset Management and Engineering.
    3. He, William Peng & Lepone, Andrew, 2014. "Determinants of liquidity and execution probability in exchange operated dark pool: Evidence from the Australian Securities Exchange," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 1-16.
    4. Levin, Eric J. & Wright, Robert E., 2004. "Estimating the profit markup component of the bid-ask spread: evidence from the London Stock Exchange," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 1-19, February.
    5. Weiyu Kuo & Yu‐Ching Li, 2011. "Trading Mechanisms and Market Quality: Call Markets versus Continuous Auction Markets," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 11(4), pages 417-444, December.
    6. Vinay Patel, 2015. "Price Discovery in US and Australian Stock and Options Markets," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 27.
    7. Lecce, Steven & Lepone, Andrew & McKenzie, Michael D. & Segara, Reuben, 2012. "The impact of naked short selling on the securities lending and equity market," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 81-107.
    8. Bart Frijns & Aaron Gilbert & Alireza Tourani-Rad, 2008. "Insider Trading, Regulation, And The Components Of The Bid-Ask Spread," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 31(3), pages 225-246.
    9. Tapia Torres, Miguel Ángel & Escribano Sáez, Álvaro & Pascual, Roberto, 2000. "Adverse selection costs, trading activity and liquidity in the NYSE: an empirical analysis in a dynamic context," UC3M Working papers. Economics 7276, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    10. Patel, Vinay & Michayluk, David, 2016. "Return predictability following different drivers of large price changes," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 202-214.
    11. Liu, Qingfu & Hua, Renhai & An, Yunbi, 2016. "Determinants and information content of intraday bid-ask spreads: Evidence from Chinese commodity futures markets," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 135-148.
    12. Rudy De Winne & Christophe Majois, 2003. "A comparison of alternative spread décomposition models on Euronext Brussels," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 46(4), pages 91-136.
    13. Lijian Wei & Wei Zhang & Xue-Zhong He & Yongjie Zhang, 2013. "Learning and Information Dissemination in Limit Order Markets," Research Paper Series 333, Quantitative Finance Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney.
    14. Charoenwong, Charlie & Ding, David K. & Siraprapasiri, Vasan, 2011. "Adverse selection and corporate governance," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 406-420, June.
    15. Yu Chuan Huang, 2004. "The components of bid‐ask spread and their determinants: TAIFEX versus SGX‐DT," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(9), pages 835-860, September.
    16. He, William Peng & Lepone, Andrew & Leung, Henry, 2013. "Information asymmetry and the cost of equity capital," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 611-620.
    17. Chen, Langnan & Luo, Jiawen & Liu, Hao, 2013. "The determinants of liquidity with G-RJMCMC-VS model: Evidence from China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 192-198.
    18. Jieun Lee & Doojin Ryu & Ali M. Kutan, 2016. "Monetary Policy Announcements, Communication, and Stock Market Liquidity," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 227-250, September.

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