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From T-Bills to Common Stocks: Investigating the Generality of Intra-Week Return Seasonality

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  • Flannery, Mark J
  • Protopapadakis, Aris A

Abstract

The authors investigate the extent to which intraweek seasonality still exists, and whether its pattern is uniform across thr ee stock indices and Treasury bonds with seven different maturities. They find that intraweek seasonality continues to be significant, and that its pattern is not uniform, either between the stock indices an d the Treasury bonds or even only among the bonds. A pattern shared b y stocks and bonds is that Monday returns become increasingly negativ e with maturity. These findings suggest that neither institutional no r general equilibrium explanations by themselves can explain the patt ern of intraweek seasonality. Copyright 1988 by American Finance Association.

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  • Flannery, Mark J & Protopapadakis, Aris A, 1988. " From T-Bills to Common Stocks: Investigating the Generality of Intra-Week Return Seasonality," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(2), pages 431-450, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jfinan:v:43:y:1988:i:2:p:431-50
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    Cited by:

    1. Frühwirth, Manfred & Sögner, Leopold, 2015. "Weather and SAD related mood effects on the financial market," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 11-31.
    2. Bruce Mizrach & Christopher J. Neely, 2007. "The microstructure of the U.S. treasury market," Working Papers 2007-052, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    3. David R. Peterson, 1990. "A Transaction Data Study Of Day-Of-The-Week And Intraday Patterns In Option Returns," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 13(2), pages 117-131, June.
    4. Jakub Keller, 2016. "Day-of-the-week effect among the smallest enterprises listed on WSE," "e-Finanse", University of Information Technology and Management, Institute of Financial Research and Analysis, vol. 11(3), pages 92-102, February.
    5. Mark D. Griffiths & Drew B. Winters, 1996. "The Relation Between The Federal Funds Cash And Futures Markets," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 19(3), pages 359-376, September.
    6. Sullivan, Ryan & Timmermann, Allan & White, Halbert, 1998. "Dangers of Data-Driven Inference: The Case of Calendar Effects in Stock Returns," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt2z02z6d9, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    7. Mark J. Flannery & Aris A. Protopapadakis, 2002. "Macroeconomic Factors Do Influence Aggregate Stock Returns," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(3), pages 751-782.
    8. Wilson, Berry & Saunders, Anthony, 2004. "Monetary secrecy and selective disclosure: The emerging market case of Mexico's monetary reporting," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1-2), pages 199-210.
    9. G. Kohers & N. Kohers & V. Pandey & T. Kohers, 2004. "The disappearing day-of-the-week effect in the world's largest equity markets," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 167-171.
    10. Syed Basher & Perry Sadorsky, 2006. "Day-of-the-week effects in emerging stock markets," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(10), pages 621-628.
    11. Ramon P. DeGennaro & James T. Moser, 1990. "Failed delivery and daily Treasury bill returns," Working Paper 9003, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    12. Allan Timmermann & Halbert White & Ryan Sullivan, 1998. "The Dangers of Data-Driven Inference: The Case of Calendar Effects in Stock Returns," FMG Discussion Papers dp304, Financial Markets Group.
    13. J. Clay Singleton & John R. Wingender, 1994. "The Nonparallel Weekend Effect In The Stock And Bond Markets," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 17(4), pages 531-538, December.

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