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Financial Markets, Development and Economic Growth: Tales of Informational Asymmetries

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  • Salvatore Capasso

Abstract

The development of financial systems is very often characterised by the development of innovative financial contracts which allow a more efficient allocation of resources and a higher level of capital productivity and economic growth. By exploiting the microeconomic theory of the optimal financial contract under asymmetric information, economists have recently managed to shed new light on the well studied issue of the relationship between financial market development and economic growth. This paper reviews the most recent progress of this literature which shows that the amount of information asymmetry in the credit market and the degree of heterogeneity between borrowers "typically firms" and lenders "typically workers or savers" determine the nature of the financial system. Differences in endowments and in the level of information distribution can give rise to very different financial contracts which affect, and in turn are affected, by capital accumulation and growth. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Ltd, 2004.

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  • Salvatore Capasso, 2004. "Financial Markets, Development and Economic Growth: Tales of Informational Asymmetries," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18, pages 267-292, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:18:y:2004:i::p:267-292
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    1. Antonio Garofalo & R. Plasman & Concetto Paolo Vinci, 2000. "Reducing Working Time In An Efficiency Wage Economy With A Dual Labour Market," Working Papers 7_2000, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
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    Cited by:

    1. Trew, Alex, 2008. "Efficiency, depth and growth: Quantitative implications of finance and growth theory," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1550-1568, December.
    2. Giancarlo Bertocco, 2011. "Housing bubble and economic theory: is mainstream theory able to explain the crisis?," Economics and Quantitative Methods qf1116, Department of Economics, University of Insubria.
    3. Trew, Alex, 2014. "Finance And Balanced Growth," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, pages 883-898.
    4. Keith Blackburn & Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2005. "Growth, Uncertainty and Finance," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0525, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    5. Leisen Fabrizio & Mira Antonietta, 2006. "Coalescence time and second largest eigenvalue modulus in the monotone reversible case," Economics and Quantitative Methods qf06011, Department of Economics, University of Insubria.
    6. Lino Sau, 2012. "Evolution of China's financial system and its impact on economic development," International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(1), pages 1-15.
    7. Dimitrios Varvarigos & Keith Blackburn, 2005. "Growth, Uncertainty and Finance," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2005 12, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
    8. P N Snowden, 2005. "Capital structure and a difference of opinion: stock markets, minority equity and economic development," Working Papers 566728, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    9. Bertocco, Giancarlo, 2008. "Finance and development: Is Schumpeter's analysis still relevant?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1161-1175, June.
    10. K Blackburn & D Varvarigos, 2005. "Growth, Uncertainty and Finance," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 48, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    11. Giancarlo Bertocco, 2009. "The Relationship Between Saving and Credit from a Schumpeterian Perspective," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 607-640.
    12. Siong Law & W. Azman-Saini, 2012. "Institutional quality, governance, and financial development," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 217-236, September.

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