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Trade Politics Ain't What It Used to Be: The European Union in the Doha Round




The European Union is a key player in the Doha Development Round of multilateral trade negotiations. This article argues that its negotiating position reflects distinctive patterns of politics underlying three aspects of trade policy - traditional trade policy, commercial policy and social trade policy - characterized by different sets of actors and political dynamics. Although there is significant variation in the substance of the EU's position within each aspect of trade policy, their distinctive patterns of politics help to explain why the EU's negotiating position is most liberal in traditional trade policy and least in social trade policy. Copyright (c) 2007 The Author(s); Journal compilation (c) 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Alasdair R. Young, 2007. "Trade Politics Ain't What It Used to Be: The European Union in the Doha Round," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45, pages 789-811, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jcmkts:v:45:y:2007:i::p:789-811

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/8529 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cornelia Woll, 2005. "Learning to Act on World Trade. Preference Formation of Large Firms in the United States and the European Union," Working Papers hal-01065571, HAL.
    3. Woll, Cornelia, 2005. "Learning to Act on World Trade: Preference Formation of Large Firms in the United States and the European Union," MPIfG Discussion Paper 05/1, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    4. Cornelia Woll, 2005. "Learning to Act on World Trade. Preference Formation of Large Firms in the United States and the European Union," Sciences Po publications 05/01, Sciences Po.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sara Kahn-Nisser, 2017. "Channels of Influence: The EU and Delta Convergence of Core Labour Standards in the Eastern Neighbourhood," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 29(1), pages 127-143, January.
    2. Antoniades, Andreas, 2009. "Social Europe and/or global Europe? Globalization and flexicurity as debates on the future of Europe," MPRA Paper 28871, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Eugénia Da Conceição, 2010. "Who Controls Whom? Dynamics of Power Delegation and Agency Losses in EU Trade Politics," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48, pages 1107-1126, September.
    4. repec:bla:jcmkts:v:55:y:2017:i:4:p:832-849 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Andrea C. Bianculli, 2013. "The Effect of Trade Agendas on Regulatory Governance: When the EU Meets the Global South," KFG Working Papers p0057, Free University Berlin.
    6. Diana Popa, 2012. "Eu Contribution To Support Developing Countries," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 4(2), pages 204-220, June.
    7. repec:jes:wpaper:y:2012:v:4:p:204-220 is not listed on IDEAS

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