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Hidden Liquidity: Order Exposure Strategies Around Earnings Announcements

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  • Bidisha Chakrabarty
  • Kenneth W. Shaw

Abstract

Electronic limit order books are prevalent in financial markets. Most allow 'hidden orders,' in which the order's information is neither revealed to the market nor reflected in the National Best Bid and Offer quotes. While they enable traders to conceal information, hidden orders lose time priority to displayed orders, and thus face increased risk of non-execution. We examine hidden order activity around earnings announcements, a time when demand for the opacity of hidden orders is likely high, due to heightened private information acquisition, but demand for immediate trade execution is also likely high due to increased trading activity. We find that hidden order trade volume, the number of hidden orders executed, hidden order trade size, and the full size of hidden orders executed all increase around earnings announcements. This suggests hidden orders provide significant liquidity at a time when quoted liquidity typically falls. We also show that changes in hidden order activity at earnings announcements are related to cross-sectional variation in the firm's pre-announcement information environment, the information conveyed by the earnings announcement, and changes in quoted liquidity. Copyright (c) 2008 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Bidisha Chakrabarty & Kenneth W. Shaw, 2008. "Hidden Liquidity: Order Exposure Strategies Around Earnings Announcements," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(9-10), pages 1220-1244.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jbfnac:v:35:y:2008-11:i:9-10:p:1220-1244
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Moinas, Sophie, 2010. "Hidden Limit Orders and Liquidity in Order Driven Markets," IDEI Working Papers 600, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
    2. Katarzyna Bień-Barkowska, 2014. "“Every move you make, every step you take, I’ll be watching you” – the quest for hidden orders in the interbank FX spot market," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 45(3), pages 197-224.
    3. : Arie E. Gozluklu, 2012. "Pre-Trade Transparency and Informed Trading an Experimental Approach to Hidden Liquidity," Working Papers wpn12-05, Warwick Business School, Finance Group.
    4. Chakrabarty, Bidisha & Corwin, Shane A. & Panayides, Marios A., 2011. "When a halt is not a halt: An analysis of off-NYSE trading during NYSE market closures," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 361-386, July.

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