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Stock Dividend Announcement Effects in an Imputation Tax Environment

Author

Listed:
  • Hamish Anderson

    (Massey University, New Zealand)

  • Steven Cahan

    (Massey University, New Zealand)

  • Lawrence C. Rose

    (Massey University, New Zealand)

Abstract

A key question in asset pricing is the extent to which tax effects are passed through market prices or are capitalised in them. New Zealand stock dividends provide a useful window into this debate because of (1) the existence of both taxable and non-taxable stock dividends, and (2) the particular form of imputation tax system which allows the full pass through of corporate taxes to the investor on the proportion of profits which are distributed either as cash or taxable stock dividends. We present evidence that investors value future tax benefits associated with imputation tax credits. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2001.

Suggested Citation

  • Hamish Anderson & Steven Cahan & Lawrence C. Rose, 2001. "Stock Dividend Announcement Effects in an Imputation Tax Environment," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5-6), pages 653-669.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jbfnac:v:28:y:2001-06:i:5-6:p:653-669
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kevin Campbell & Chijioke Ohuocha, 2011. "The stock market reaction to stock dividends in Nigeria and their information content," Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(3), pages 295-311, February.
    2. Hamish D. Anderson & Lawrence C. Rose & Steven F. Cahan, 2004. "Odd-lot Costs and Taxation Influences on Stock Dividend Ex-dates," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(9-10), pages 1419-1448.
    3. Cahit Adaoglu & Meziane Lasfer, 2011. "Why Do Companies Pay Stock Dividends? The Case of Bonus Distributions in an Inflationary Environment," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(5-6), pages 601-627, June.
    4. Bechmann, Ken L. & Raaballe, Johannes, 2004. "The Differences Between Stock Splits and Stock Dividends," Working Papers 2004-1, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Finance.
    5. Balachandran, Balasingham & Faff, Robert & Tanner, Sally, 2004. "Further evidence on the announcement effect of bonus shares in an imputation tax setting," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 147-170, August.

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