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Germany's New Insider Law: The Empirical Evidence after the First Year

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  • Olaf Stotz

Abstract

This paper investigates insider trading activities in German stocks during the first year following implementation of the new Insider Law on 1 July 2002. It can be observed that insiders act as contrarian investors. They buy stocks after prices have fallen and sell stocks after prices have risen. In general, insider trades are very profitable. A typical stock purchased by an insider yields an abnormal return of almost 3 per cent during the 25 days following the transaction. In contrast, a typical stock that has been sold by insiders achieves an abnormal return of nearly - 3 per cent over the same time period. Outsiders who copy the transactions of insiders can achieve nearly the same abnormal returns. Abnormal returns remain substantial even after transaction costs. The results suggest that prices of stocks in which insiders trade do not seem to be semi-strong efficient. Copyright Verein für Socialpolitik and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2006.

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  • Olaf Stotz, 2006. "Germany's New Insider Law: The Empirical Evidence after the First Year," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7, pages 449-462, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:germec:v:7:y:2006:i::p:449-462
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gregory, Alan, et al, 1994. "UK Directors' Trading: The Impact of Dealings in Smaller Firms," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(422), pages 37-53, January.
    2. Michael S. Rozeff & Mir A. Zaman, 1998. "Overreaction and Insider Trading: Evidence from Growth and Value Portfolios," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(2), pages 701-716, April.
    3. Brown, Stephen J. & Weinstein, Mark I., 1985. "Derived factors in event studies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 491-495, September.
    4. Conrad, Jennifer & Kaul, Gautam, 1993. " Long-Term Market Overreaction or Biases in Computed Returns?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(1), pages 39-63, March.
    5. H. Nejat Seyhun, 1992. "Why Does Aggregate Insider Trading Predict Future Stock Returns?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1303-1331.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lukas Menkhoff & Maik Schmeling & Ulrich Schmidt, 2010. "Are All Professional Investors Sophisticated?," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 11, pages 418-440, November.
    2. Kaspar Dardas & Andre Güttler, 2011. "Are directors’ dealings informative? Evidence from European stock markets," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer;Swiss Society for Financial Market Research, vol. 25(2), pages 111-148, June.
    3. Stotz, Olaf & Georgi, Dominik, 2012. "A logit model of retail investors' individual trading decisions and their relations to insider trades," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 159-167.
    4. Sebastian Dickgiesser & Christoph Kaserer, 2010. "Market Efficiency Reloaded: Why Insider Trades do not Reveal Exploitable Information," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 11, pages 302-335, August.

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