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Ownership structure and investment finance in transition economies

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  • Igor Filatotchev
  • Natalia Isachenkova
  • Tomasz Mickiewicz

Abstract

Using survey data on 157 large private Hungarian and Polish companies this paper investigates links between ownership structures and CEOs' expectations with regard to sources of finance for investment. The Bayesian estimation is used to deal with the small sample restrictions, while classical methods provide robustness checks. We found a hump-shaped relationship between ownership concentration and expectations of relying on public equity. The latter is most likely for firms where the largest investor owns between 25 percent and 49 percent of shares, just below the legal control threshold. More profitable firms rely on retained earnings for their investment finance, consistent with the 'pecking order' theory of financing. Finally, firms for which the largest shareholder is a domestic institutional investor are more likely to borrow from domestic banks. Copyright (c) 2007 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2007 The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development .

Suggested Citation

  • Igor Filatotchev & Natalia Isachenkova & Tomasz Mickiewicz, 2007. "Ownership structure and investment finance in transition economies," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 15, pages 433-460, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:15:y:2007:i::p:433-460
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ralph de Haas & Marga Peeters, 2004. "The Dynamic Adjustment towards Target capital Structures of Firms in," DNB Staff Reports (discontinued) 123, Netherlands Central Bank.
    2. Gros,Daniel & Steinherr,Alfred, 2004. "Economic Transition in Central and Eastern Europe," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521826389, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sai Ding & Alessandra Guariglia & John Knight, "undated". "Negative investment in China: financing constraints and restructuring versus growth," Discussion Papers 12/01, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    2. Grosfeld, Irena, 2009. "Large shareholders and firm value: Are high-tech firms different?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 259-277, September.
    3. Tomasz Mickiewicz, 2009. "Hierarchy of governance institutions and the pecking order of privatisation: Central-Eastern Europe and Central Asia reconsidered," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 399-423.
    4. Irena Grosfeld, 2009. "Large shareholders and firm value: Are high-tech firms different?," Working Papers halshs-00587856, HAL.
    5. Mykhayliv, Dariya & Zauner, Klaus G., 2013. "Investment behavior and ownership structures in Ukraine: Soft budget constraints, government ownership and private benefits of control," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 265-278.
    6. Dariya Mykhayliv & Klaus G. Zauner, 2015. "Investment Behaviour, Corporate Control, And Private Benefits Of Control: Evidence From A Survey Of Ukrainian Firms," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(4), pages 309-323, October.
    7. Olga Lazareva & Andrei Rachinsky & Sergey Stepanov, 2008. "Corporate Governance, Ownership Structures and Investment in Transition Economies: the Case of Russia, Ukraine and Kyrgyzstan," Working Papers w0119, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).

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