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Worker flows, job flows and firm wage policies

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  • John Haltiwanger
  • Milan Vodopivec

Abstract

Like many transition economies, Slovenia is undergoing profound changes in the workings of the labour market with potentially greater flexibility in terms of both wage and employment adjustment. To investigate the impact of these changes, we use unique longitudinal matched employer-employee data that permits measurement of employment transitions and wages for workers and enables links of the workers to the firms in which they are employed. We can thus measure worker flows and job flows in a comprehensive and integrated manner. We find a high pace of job flows in Slovenia especially for young, small, private and foreign-owned firms and for young, less educated workers. While job flows have approached the rates observed in developed market economies, the excess of worker flows above job flows is lower than that observed in market economies. A key factor in the patterns of the worker and job flows is the determination of wages in Slovenia. A base wage schedule provides strict guidelines for minimum wages for different skill categories. However, firms are permitted to offer higher wages to an individual based upon the success of the worker and/or the firm. Our analysis shows that firms deviate from the base wage schedule significantly and that the idiosyncratic wage policies of firms are closely related to the observed pattern of worker and job flows at the firm. Firms with more flexible wages (measured as less compression of wages within the firm) have less employment instability and are also able to improve the match quality of their workers. Copyright (c)The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 2003.

Suggested Citation

  • John Haltiwanger & Milan Vodopivec, 2003. "Worker flows, job flows and firm wage policies," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 11(2), pages 253-290, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:11:y:2003-06:i:2:p:253-290
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gielen, A. C. & van Ours, J.C., 2006. "Why do Worker-Firm Matches Dissolve?," Discussion Paper 2006-57, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    2. Wojciech Hardy & Aneta Kielczewska & Piotr Lewandowski & Iga Magda, 2016. "Job retention among older workers in Central and Eastern Europe," IBS Working Papers 11/2016, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    3. Jaanika Merikull & Pille Mõtsmees, 2015. "Do you get what you ask? The gender gap in desired and realised wages," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2014-9, Bank of Estonia, revised 20 Jan 2015.
    4. Naércio Aquino Menezes-Filho & Marc-Andreas Muendler & Garey Ramey, 2008. "The Structure of Worker Compensation in Brazil, with a Comparison to France and the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(2), pages 324-346, May.
    5. repec:eee:jcecon:v:46:y:2018:i:1:p:381-412 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Haltiwanger, John C. & Scarpetta, Stefano & Schweiger, Helena, 2006. "Assessing Job Flows across Countries: The Role of Industry, Firm Size and Regulations," IZA Discussion Papers 2450, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Huber, Peter & Oberhofer, Harald & Pfaffermayr, Michael, 2017. "Who creates jobs? Econometric modeling and evidence for Austrian firm level data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 57-71.
    8. Hallward-Driemeier, Mary & Rijkers, Bob & Waxman, Andrew, 2011. "Ladies first ? firm-level evidence on the labor impacts of the East Asian crisis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5789, The World Bank.
    9. Bassanini, Andrea & Marianna, Pascal, 2009. "Looking Inside the Perpetual-Motion Machine: Job and Worker Flows in OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 4452, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. María Isabel Rodríguez-Ferradas & José A. Alfaro-Tanco & Francesco Sandulli, 2016. "A framework for Open Innovation practices: Typology and characterisation," Faculty Working Papers 02/16, School of Economics and Business Administration, University of Navarra.
    11. Tyrowicz, Joanna, 2017. "Labor Reallocation and Demographics," IZA Discussion Papers 11249, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Naércio Aquino Menezes-Filho & Marc-Andreas Muendler & Garey Ramey, 2008. "The Structure of Worker Compensation in Brazil, with a Comparison to France and the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(2), pages 324-346, May.
    13. Yen-Ling Lin, 2013. "Wage Effects of Employment Protection Legislation in Taiwan," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 27(2), pages 145-161, June.
    14. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:4:p:1018-1056 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. repec:eee:ecosys:v:42:y:2018:i:1:p:164-173 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Guertzgen, Nicole, 2007. "Job and Worker Reallocation in German Establishments: The Role of Employers? Wage Policies and Labour Market Institutions," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-084, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    17. Joanna Tyrowicz & Lucas van der Velde, 2014. "Can We Really Explain Worker Flows in Transition Economies?," Working Papers 2014-28, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    18. Jozef Konings & Olga Kupets & Hartmut Lehmann, 2003. "Gross job flows in Ukraine," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 11(2), pages 321-356, June.

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