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Lessons from a collapse of a financial system

Author

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  • Sigridur Benediktsdottir
  • Jon Danielsson
  • Gylfi Zoega

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  • Sigridur Benediktsdottir & Jon Danielsson & Gylfi Zoega, 2011. "Lessons from a collapse of a financial system," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 26(66), pages 183-231, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecpoli:v:26:y:2011:i:66:p:183-231
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    2. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2014. "This Time is Different: A Panoramic View of Eight Centuries of Financial Crises," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(2), pages 1065-1188, November.
    3. Frye, Timothy & Shleifer, Andrei, 1997. "The Invisible Hand and the Grabbing Hand," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 354-358, May.
    4. Thorvardur Tjörvi Ólafsson & Thórarinn G. Pétursson, 2010. "Weathering the financial storm: The importance of fundamentals and flexibility," Economics wp51, Department of Economics, Central bank of Iceland.
    5. Shaffer, Sherrill, 1998. "The Winner's Curse in Banking," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 359-392, October.
    6. Gabriel Jiménez & Jesús Saurina, 2006. "Credit Cycles, Credit Risk, and Prudential Regulation," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(2), May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:atlecj:v:45:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11293-017-9555-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hamid Raza & Gylfi Zoega & Stephen Kinsella, 2017. "Capital inflows, crisis and recovery in small open economies," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1709, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
    3. Hauck, Achim & Vollmer, Uwe, 2013. "Emergency liquidity provision to public banks: Rules versus discretion," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 193-204.
    4. Zsolt Darvas, 2011. "A Tale of Three Countries: Recovery after Banking Crises," Working Papers 1106, Department of Mathematical Economics and Economic Analysis, Corvinus University of Budapest.
    5. Han-Hsing Lee & Kuanyu Shih & Kehluh Wang, 2016. "Measuring sovereign credit risk using a structural model approach," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 1097-1128, November.
    6. Maier, Ulf, 2016. "Multinational banks: Supranational resolution regimes and the importance of capital regulation," Discussion Papers in Economics 29630, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    7. Fridriksson, Kari S. & Zoega, Gylfi, 2012. "Advertising as a predictor of investment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(1), pages 60-66.
    8. Gylfi Zoega, 2016. "Responding to Capital Flows in a Very Small Economy," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 44(2), pages 159-170, June.
    9. Pagano, Marco, 2014. "Lessons from the European financial crisis," CFS Working Paper Series 486, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    10. Marco Pagano, 2013. "Finance: Economic Lifeblood or Toxin?," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Social Value of the Financial Sector Too Big to Fail or Just Too Big?, chapter 8, pages 109-146 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    11. Marco Pagano & ESRB Advisory Scientific Committee, 2014. "Is Europe Overbanked?," mBank - CASE Seminar Proceedings 132, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    12. Ásgeirsdóttir, Tinna Laufey & Corman, Hope & Noonan, Kelly & Ólafsdóttir, Þórhildur & Reichman, Nancy E., 2014. "Was the economic crisis of 2008 good for Icelanders? Impact on health behaviors," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 1-19.
    13. Marco Pagano, 2014. "Dealing with Financial Crises: How Much Help from Research?," CSEF Working Papers 361, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    14. Dorothee Bohle, 2017. "Mortgaging Europe’s periphery," LEQS – LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series 124, European Institute, LSE.
    15. Ágúst Arnórsson & Gylfi Zoega, 2015. "Do Interest Rates Affect the Exchange Rate under Capital Controls? An event study of Iceland’s experience with capital controls," Economics wp70, Department of Economics, Central bank of Iceland.
    16. Howden, David, 2013. "The Icelandic and Irish Banking Crises: Alternative Paths to a Credit-Induced Collapse," MPRA Paper 79602, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Sigríður Benediktsdóttir & Gauti B. Eggertsson & Eggert Þórarinsson, 2017. "The Rise, the Fall, and the Resurrection of Iceland," NBER Working Papers 24005, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Gudmundsson, Gudmundur S. & Zoega, Gylfi, 2016. "A double-edged sword: High interest rates in capital control regimes," Economics Discussion Papers 2016-3, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    19. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:62:y:2017:i:01:n:s0217590817400069 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Thorvaldur Gylfason, 2014. "Iceland: How Could This Happen?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4605, CESifo Group Munich.

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