IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ecpoli/v22y2007ip71-116.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Capital deepening and wage differentials: Germany versus US

Author

Listed:
  • Winfried Koeniger
  • Marco Leonardi

Abstract

"In flexible labour markets, capital increases the productivity of skilled workers more than that of unskilled workers, and in the US faster investment is associated with wider wage inequality. But labour market institutions that keep unskilled workers' wages high also imply that firms may find it profitable to invest so as to boost those workers' productivity. Our empirical analysis based on industry-level data confirms that a higher capital intensity in Germany is associated with smaller wage differentials and with a larger share of unskilled workers in the labour costs. Changes in capital-labour ratios during the 1980s reduced wage differentials by 5-8% in German industries, while in the US capital deepening in such industries as machinery and retail was accompanied by an increase of wage differentials larger than 7%." Copyright (c) CEPR, CES, MSH, 2007.

Suggested Citation

  • Winfried Koeniger & Marco Leonardi, 2007. "Capital deepening and wage differentials: Germany versus US," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 22, pages 71-116, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecpoli:v:22:y:2007:i::p:71-116
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-0327.2007.00173.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Conti, Maurizio & Sulis, Giovanni, 2016. "Human capital, employment protection and growth in Europe," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 213-230.
    2. Federico Cingano & Marco Leonardi & Julián Messina & Giovanni Pica, 2010. "The effects of employment protection legislation and financial market imperfections on investment: evidence from a firm-level panel of EU countries," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 25, pages 117-163, January.
    3. Lorenzo Cappellari & Carlo Dell'Aringa & Marco Leonardi, 2010. "Flexible Employment, Job Flows and Labour Productivity," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Economia dell'Impresa e del Lavoro ieil0060, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    4. Lorenzo Cappellari & Carlo Dell’Aringa & Marco Leonardi, 2012. "Temporary Employment, Job Flows and Productivity: A Tale of Two Reforms," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(562), pages 188-215, August.
    5. Zsófia L. Bárány, 2016. "The Minimum Wage and Inequality: The Effects of Education and Technology," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(1), pages 237-274.
    6. Alberto Alesina & Michele Battisti & Joseph Zeira, 2015. "Technology and Labor Regulations: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 20841, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Tyrowicz, Joanna & Smyk, Magdalena, 2017. "Wage Inequality and Structural Change," IZA Discussion Papers 11250, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Ryosuke Okazawa, 2013. "Skill-biased technical change, educational choice, and labor market polarization: the U.S. versus Europe," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 11(3), pages 321-342, September.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ecpoli:v:22:y:2007:i::p:71-116. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cebruuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.