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Concentration and public policies in the broadcasting industry: the future of television

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  • Massimo Motta
  • Michele Polo

Abstract

New technologies are deeply transforming the broadcasting industry. What we have seen so far is only the beginning of a long story. Inevitably, industry regulations must adapt, which means that a wide-ranging rethink of current practices is required. In order to assess the likely evolution of the industry, this article decomposes it into a number of components, from conception of programmes to their broadcasting, including distribution, storage and licensing. Contrary to popular expectations, the analysis suggests that the current high degree of concentration will, if anything, increase. The policy implication is that regulation, so far driven by now obsolete technological constraints, should increasingly emphasize promoting competition. Copyright Centre for Economic Policy Research, Centre for Economic Studies, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme 1997.

Suggested Citation

  • Massimo Motta & Michele Polo, 1997. "Concentration and public policies in the broadcasting industry: the future of television," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 12(25), pages 293-334, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecpoli:v:12:y:1997:i:25:p:293-334
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    Cited by:

    1. Machiel Dijk & Richard Nahuis & Daniel Waagmeester, 2006. "Does Public Service Broadcasting Serve The Public? The Future of Television in the Changing Media Landscape," De Economist, Springer, vol. 154(2), pages 251-276, June.
    2. Nilssen, Tore & Sorgard, Lars, 2002. "A public firm challenged by entry: duplication or diversity?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 259-274, March.
    3. Anderson, Simon P. & Gabszewicz, Jean J., 2006. "The Media and Advertising: A Tale of Two-Sided Markets," Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, Elsevier.
    4. Andreano, Simona & Iapadre, Lelio, 2003. "Audiovisual policies and international trade: The case of Italy," HWWA Reports 234, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    5. Kind, Hans Jarle & Nilssen, Tore & Sørgard, Lars, 2005. "Advertising on TV: Under- or Overprovision?," Memorandum 15/2005, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    6. Michele Polo, 2016. "Entry Games and Free Entry Equilibria," IEFE Working Papers 87, IEFE, Center for Research on Energy and Environmental Economics and Policy, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    7. Simon P. Anderson & Stephen Coate, 2005. "Market Provision of Broadcasting: A Welfare Analysis," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(4), pages 947-972.
    8. Paul Fenn & David Paton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2009. "Productivity growth and funding of public service broadcasting," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(3), pages 335-349, December.
    9. Ghoneim, Ahmed Farouk, 2004. "Competition, cultural variety and global governance: The case of the Egyptian audiovisual system," HWWA Reports 246, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    10. Nilssen, Tore & Sørgard, Lars, 2000. "TV Advertising, Program Quality, and Product-Market Oligopoly," Competition Policy Center, Working Paper Series qt2zp943hj, Competition Policy Center, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    11. Oliver Budzinski & Katharina Wacker, 2007. "The Prohibition Of The Proposed Springer-Prosiebensat.1 Merger: How Much Economics In German Merger Control?," Journal of Competition Law and Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(2), pages 281-306.
    12. Massimo Motta & Michele Polo, 2001. "Beyond the Spectrum Constraint: Concentration and Entry in the Broadcasting Industry," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 91(4), pages 115-150, April-May.
    13. Beck Hanno & Beyer Andrea, 2013. "Öffentlich-Rechtlicher Rundfunk in der Krise: Reformbedarf und Reformoptionen / Public broadcasting in crisis," ORDO. Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, De Gruyter, vol. 64(1), pages 221-252, January.
    14. Amnon Levy & Benoit Freyens, 2011. "Optimal Control of Broadcasting Spectrum with a Variety-Reception Tradeoff and Consumers’ Income Sensitivity," Economics Working Papers wp11-03, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    15. Julia Rothbauer & Gernot Sieg, 2013. "Public Service Broadcasting of Sport, Shows, and News to Mitigate Rational Ignorance," Journal of Media Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 21-40, March.
    16. Nilssen,T. & Sorgard,L., 2001. "The TV industry : advertising and programming," Memorandum 18/2001, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    17. Amnon Levy & Benoît Freyens, 2012. "Optimal Control of Broadcasting Spectrum with Variety-Reception Trade-off and Consumers’ Income Sensitivity," Economics Working Papers wp12-10, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    18. Hans Jarle Kind & Tore Nilssen & Lars Sørgard, 2007. "Competition for Viewers and Advertisers in a TV Oligopoly," Journal of Media Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 211-233.
    19. John O'Hagan & Michael Jennings, 2003. "Public Broadcasting in Europe: Rationale, Licence Fee and Other Issues," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 27(1), pages 31-56, February.
    20. Amnon Levy & Michael R. Caputo & Benoît Pierre Freyens, 2013. "Royalties, Entry and Spectrum Allocation to Broadcasting," Economics Working Papers wp13-02, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

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