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Would Excess Capacity in Public Firms Be Socially Optimal?

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  • Wen, Mei
  • Sasaki, Dan

Abstract

We analyse oligopolistic interactions between a welfare-maximizing public firm and a profit-maximizing private firm in a repeated game. We find that the public firm can hold excess capacity as a strategic punishment device to sustain a subgame perfect equilibrium which is welfare-superior to the static Nash equilibrium. Basically, potential punishment from the public firm in the dynamic game can make the self-interested private firm behave in the public interest. Furthermore, if capacity is endogenous, public excess capacity can occur in a welfare efficient equilibrium when the cost of public capacity investment is higher than that of private investment. Copyright 2001 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Wen, Mei & Sasaki, Dan, 2001. "Would Excess Capacity in Public Firms Be Socially Optimal?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 77(238), pages 283-290, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:77:y:2001:i:238:p:283-90
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Zheng, Shiyuan & Negenborn, Rudy R., 2014. "Centralization or decentralization: A comparative analysis of port regulation modes," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 21-40.
    2. Juan Carlos Bárcena‐Ruiz & Maria Begoña Garzón, 2010. "Endogenous Timing In A Mixed Duopoly With Capacity Choice," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 78(2), pages 93-109, March.
    3. Jorge Fernández-Ruiz, 2012. "Capacity choice in a mixed duopoly with a foreign competitor," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(3), pages 2653-2661.
    4. Kazuhiro Ohnishi, 2009. "Capacity Investment and Mixed Duopoly with State-Owned and Labor-Managed Firms," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 10(1), pages 49-64, May.
    5. Luciano Fanti & Nicola Meccheri, 2014. "Capacity choice and welfare under alternative unionisation structures," Discussion Papers 2014/176, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    6. Toshihiro Matsumura, 2003. "Stackelberg Mixed Duopoly with a Foreign Competitor," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 275-287, July.
    7. Haraguchi, Junichi & Matsumura, Toshihiro, 2018. "Government-leading welfare-improving collusion," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 363-370.
    8. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:12:y:2004:i:2:p:1-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Filipa Mota & João Correia-da-Silva & Joana Pinho, 2023. "Public–Private Collusion," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 62(4), pages 393-417, June.
    10. Jorge Fernández-Ruiz, 2019. "Capacity choice and optimal privatization in a mixed duopoly," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(4), pages 2751-2765.
    11. Wang, Leonard F.S. & Mukherjee, Arijit, 2012. "Undesirable competition," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 114(2), pages 175-177.
    12. Kazuhiro Ohnishi, 2008. "International mixed duopoly and strategic commitments," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 421-432, February.
    13. Hikaru Ogawa & Akira Nishimori, 2004. "Do Firms Always Choose Excess Capacity?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 12(2), pages 1-7.
    14. Luciano Fanti & Nicola Meccheri, 2017. "Unionization Regimes, Capacity Choice by Firms and Welfare Outcomes," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 85(6), pages 661-681, December.
    15. Kazuhiro Ohnishi, 2013. "A Two-production-period Model with State-owned and Labour-managed Firms," Institutions and Economies (formerly known as International Journal of Institutions and Economies), Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, vol. 5(1), pages 41-56, April.
    16. Juan Carlos Barcena-Ruiz & María Begoña Garzón, 2007. "Capacity Choice in a Mixed Duopoly under Price Competition," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 12(26), pages 1-7.
    17. Kazuhiro Ohnishi, 2010. "A Three‐Stage International Mixed Duopoly With A Wage‐Rise Contract As A Strategic Commitment," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 78(4), pages 279-289, July.
    18. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:12:y:2007:i:26:p:1-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Kazuhiro Ohnishi, 2022. "Lifetime Employment and Stackelberg Mixed Duopoly Games with a Foreign Labour-Managed Competitor," Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, , vol. 21(1), pages 27-42, June.
    20. Kazuhiro Ohnishi, 2011. "A Quantity-Setting Mixed Duopoly with Inventory Investment as a Coordination Device," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 12(1), pages 109-119, May.
    21. Kangsik Choi & DongJoon Lee, 2020. "Do firms choose overcapacity or undercapacity in a vertical structure?," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 41(5), pages 839-847, July.
    22. Ishibashi, Ikuo & Matsumura, Toshihiro, 2006. "R&D competition between public and private sectors," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(6), pages 1347-1366, August.

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