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A Structural VAR Model of the Australian Economy

Author

Listed:
  • Dungey, Mardi
  • Pagan, Adrian

Abstract

We develop an 11-variable structural VAR for the Australian economy over the period 1980 to 1998. The VAR methodology has only relatively recently been applied in the Australian context, despite its popularity in quantitative macroeconomics internationally. Our model includes an overseas sector which distinguishes between goods and asset markets so as to disentangle the effects of shocks emanating from each source. We utilize our model to dissect the Australian growth cycle into its separate influences and to study the Asian crisis. Throughout there is a strong emphasis upon identifying the impact of monetary policy. Copyright 2000 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Dungey, Mardi & Pagan, Adrian, 2000. "A Structural VAR Model of the Australian Economy," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 76(235), pages 321-342, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:76:y:2000:i:235:p:321-42
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    References listed on IDEAS

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