IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ecorec/v76y2000i234p236-54.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Trends in Child Proverty in Australia, 1982 to 1995-96

Author

Listed:
  • Harding, Ann
  • Szukalska, Aggie

Abstract

This study suggests that child poverty in Australia fell by about one-third between 1982 and 1995-96, largely as a result of the very substantial increases in government cash payments to lower income families with children. However, while there were sharp falls in poverty among dependent children, poverty rates among 15 to 18 year-olds who had left the parental home or who were still living at home but not in full-time study increased very sharply. In addition, the after-housing poverty picture did not look so optimistic, apparently due to a compositional shift in the types of families in after-housing poverty. Copyright 2000 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Harding, Ann & Szukalska, Aggie, 2000. "Trends in Child Proverty in Australia, 1982 to 1995-96," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 76(234), pages 236-254, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:76:y:2000:i:234:p:236-54
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jill Wright & Ma. Rebecca Valenzuela & Duangkamon Chotikapanich, 2011. "Measuring Poverty and Inequality from Highly Aggregated Small Area Data: The Changing Fortunes of Latrobe Valley Households," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 4/12, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    2. Sri Ranjith & Anil Rupasingha, 2012. "Social and Cultural Determinants of Child Poverty in the United States," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(1), pages 119-142.
    3. Rebecca Valenzuela & Hooi Hooi Lean, 2007. "Stochastic Dominance Analysis Of Australian Income Distributions," Monash Economics Working Papers 21-07, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    4. Arturo Martinez & Francisco Perales, 2017. "The Dynamics of Multidimensional Poverty in Contemporary Australia," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 130(2), pages 479-496, January.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:76:y:2000:i:234:p:236-54. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/esausea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.