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Lifetime Net Average Tax Rates in Australia since Federation--A Generational Accounting Study

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  • Ablett, John
  • Tseggai-Bocurezion, Zaid

Abstract

This paper presents estimates of average net payments to government, as a percent of average lifetime labour earnings, for generations born in Australia since Federation (1901), based on historical data combined with several reasonable future scenarios covering fiscal policy, growth and demographic change. The results shed light on whether certain generations have been treated more favourably by the public sector than others this century. The main conclusion is that the average lifetime net tax rate will, under reasonable assumptions, be of the order of 37-39 percent for all currently living generations born since the mid-1930s. Copyright 2000 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Ablett, John & Tseggai-Bocurezion, Zaid, 2000. "Lifetime Net Average Tax Rates in Australia since Federation--A Generational Accounting Study," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 76(233), pages 139-151, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:76:y:2000:i:233:p:139-51
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    Cited by:

    1. SHIMASAWA Manabu & OGURO Kazumasa, 2016. "Will Abenomics Save Future Generations?," Discussion papers 16100, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. Manabu Shimasawa & Kazumasa Oguro & Minoru Masujima, "undated". "Population Aging, Policy Reforms, and Lifetime Net Tax Rate in Japan: A Generational Accounting Approach," Discussion papers ron258, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan.
    3. Poul Schou & Daniel le Maire & Steen Jørgensen, 2005. "Poor parents, rich children? - A hundred years of distribution," DREAM Working Paper Series 200501, Danish Rational Economic Agents Model, DREAM.
    4. Fukuda, Kosei, 2008. "Empirical evidence on intergenerational inequality of tax burdens in the U.S. and Japan," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2214-2220, December.
    5. Harry Ter Rele & Claudio Labanca, 2012. "Lifetime Generational Accounts for the Netherlands," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 33(3), pages 399-427, September.

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