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Do Casual Workers Find Permanent Full-Time Employment? Evidence from the Australian Youth Survey

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  • Gaston, Noel
  • Timcke, David

Abstract

The growth of casual employment in Australia is sometimes viewed with concern. Such "non-standard" forms of employment are often associated with intermittent labour force attachment, under-employment and low income. In this paper, we use data from the Australian Youth Survey to analyze the transition from casual work to full-time permanent jobs. In the short term, gender, employer-provided training and the receipt of government benefits are among the more important factors affecting the transition. However, these factors are less important in the long term. Overall, the results suggest that casual employment may be more of a "stepping stone" than a "dead-end." Copyright 1999 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Gaston, Noel & Timcke, David, 1999. "Do Casual Workers Find Permanent Full-Time Employment? Evidence from the Australian Youth Survey," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(231), pages 333-347, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:75:y:1999:i:231:p:333-47
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    Cited by:

    1. Gaston, Noel & Kishi, Tomoko, 2007. "Part-time workers doing full-time work in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 435-454, December.
    2. Bruce Chapman & Matthew Gray, 2002. "Youth Unemployment: Aggregate Incidence and Consequences for Individuals," CEPR Discussion Papers 459, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. Esteban-Pretel, Julen & Nakajima, Ryo & Tanaka, Ryuichi, 2011. "Are contingent jobs dead ends or stepping stones to regular jobs? Evidence from a structural estimation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 513-526, August.
    4. Greg Murtough & Matthew Waite, 2001. "The Diversity of Casual Contract Employment," Labor and Demography 0105003, EconWPA.
    5. Chalmers, J. & Kalb, G., 2000. "Are Casual Jobs a Freeway to Permanent Employment?," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 8/00, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    6. Tony Fang & Fiona MacPhail, 2008. "Transitions from Temporary to Permanent Work in Canada: Who Makes the Transition and Why?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 88(1), pages 51-74, August.
    7. Productivity Commission, 2006. "The Role of Non-Traditional Work in the Australian Labour Market," Research Papers 0601, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
    8. Tomoko Kishi & Noel Gaston, 2010. "Labor Market Transitions for Female Workers in Japan: The Role of Global Competition," Chapters,in: Globalization and Economic Integration, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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