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National Competition Policy


  • King, Stephen P


National competition policy is having a major effect on Australian industry. The Hilmer committee recommendations on infrastructure access, competitive neutrality, restructuring of public enterprises and legislative review have been accepted by all Australian governments. The underlying economic principles, however, are not necessarily reflected in the reforms. The process of negotiated infrastructure access established under national competition policy may lead to monopoly rather than competitive pricing. Structural reforms of government business enterprises have ignored the benefits of integration and the relevant market characteristics. Legislative review has resulted in considerable political controversy. In some cases, competition policy can be improved by simple amendments to legislation while in other cases a clearer understanding of the relevant trade-offs may improve the reform process. Copyright 1997 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • King, Stephen P, 1997. "National Competition Policy," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 73(222), pages 270-284, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:73:y:1997:i:222:p:270-84

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Dirk Schindler & Guttorm Schjelderup, 2009. "Harmonization of Corporate Tax Systems and Its Effect on Collusive Behavior," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 11(4), pages 599-621, August.
    2. MacAulay, T. Gordon, 2000. "Competition Policy in Agriculture: A Review of Methods," 2000 Conference (44th), January 23-25, 2000, Sydney, Australia 123697, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Dirk Schindler & Guttorm Schjelderup, 2006. "Company Tax Reform in Europe and its Effect on Collusive Behavior," CESifo Working Paper Series 1702, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Colombo, Luca & Labrecciosa, Paola, 2013. "How should commodities be taxed? A supergame-theoretic analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 196-205.
    5. Joshua Gans & Stephen King, 2003. "Access Holidays for Network Infrastructure Investment," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 10(2), pages 163-178.
    6. Haufler, Andreas & Schjelderup, Guttorm, 2004. "Tacit collusion and international commodity taxation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(3-4), pages 577-600, March.
    7. Bloch, Harry, et al, 2001. "The Cost Structure of Australian Telecommunications," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 77(239), pages 338-350, December.

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