IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ecorec/v72y1996i217p138-53.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Unions, Firm Size and Wages

Author

Listed:
  • Miller, Paul
  • Mulvey, Charles

Abstract

It is well established in the literature that Australian unions raise their members' wages relative to those of otherwise comparable nonmembers by some amount in the range 7-15 percent. However, it is also known that firm size is positively associated with union density and that firm size is positively associated with relative wages independent of unionism. Using a new, large and rich set of data from the Training and Education Survey 1993, the authors show that the estimated union relative wage effect is largely comprised of bias due to the omission of firm size as a variable in the wage equations usually estimated. Copyright 1996 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles, 1996. "Unions, Firm Size and Wages," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 72(217), pages 138-153, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:72:y:1996:i:217:p:138-53
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wooden, Mark, 2001. "Union Wage Effects in the Presence of Enterprise Bargaining," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 77(236), pages 1-18, March.
    2. Samantha Farmakis‐Gamboni & David Prentice, 2011. "When Does Reducing Union Bargaining Power Increase Productivity? Evidence from the Workplace Relations Act," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(279), pages 603-616, December.
    3. Seppo Kari & Jouko Ylä-Liedenpohja, 2004. "Cost of Capital for Cross-Border Investment: The Fallacy of Estonia as a Tax Haven," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 5(1), pages 28-43, December.
    4. Sumit K. Majumdar, 2011. "Cross Subsidization And Telecommunications Sector Wages," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 82(1), pages 1-24, March.
    5. Lixin Cai & Amy Y.C. Liu, 2008. "Union Wage Effects in Australia: Is There Variation along the Distribution?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(267), pages 496-510, December.
    6. Lixin Cai & C. Jeffrey Waddoups, 2009. "The Role of Unobserved Heterogeneity and On-the-Job Training in the Employer Size-Wage Effect: Evidence from Australia," Working Papers 0915, University of Nevada, Las Vegas , Department of Economics.
    7. Rudy Fichtenbaum, 2006. "Labour market segmentation and union wage gaps," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 64(3), pages 387-420.
    8. Stéphanie Lluis, 2009. "The Structure of Wages by Firm Size: A Comparison of Canada and the USA," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(2), pages 283-317, June.
    9. Heiko Haase & Arndt Lautenschl?ger, 2011. "Career Choice Motivations of University Students," International Journal of Business Administration, International Journal of Business Administration, Sciedu Press, vol. 2(1), pages 2-13, February.
    10. Elizabeth Webster & Yi-Ping Tseng, 2002. "The Determinants of Relative Wage Change in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 35(1), pages 70-84.
    11. Camilla Jensen, 2004. "Formal Integration: FDI and trade in Europe," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 5(1), pages 5-27, December.
    12. Samantha Farmakis-Gamboni & David Prentice, 2007. "Does Reducing Union Bargaining Power Increase Productivity?," Working Papers 2007.04 EDIRC Provider-In, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    13. Raul Eamets & Epp Kalaste, 2004. "The Lack of Wage Setting Power of Estonian Trade Unions?," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 5(1), pages 44-60, December.
    14. Virén, Matti, 2005. "Why do capital intensive companies pay higher wages?," Research Discussion Papers 5/2005, Bank of Finland.
    15. Matti Viren, 2006. "Higher wages and capital intensity: a closer look," Discussion Papers 13, Aboa Centre for Economics.
    16. Mark Wooden, 1999. "Gender Pay Equity and Comparable Worth in Australia: A Reassessment," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(2), pages 157-171.
    17. Clive Belfield & Xiangdong Wei, 2004. "Employer size-wage effects: evidence from matched employer-employee survey data in the UK," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(3), pages 185-193.
    18. Peter Siminski, 2013. "Are low-skill public sector workers really overpaid? A quasi-differenced panel data analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(14), pages 1915-1929, May.
    19. Lixin Cai & Amy Y. C. Liu, 2011. "Public–Private Sector Wage Gap in Australia: Variation along the Distribution," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 49(2), pages 362-390, June.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:72:y:1996:i:217:p:138-53. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/esausea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.