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The Economics of Television Regulation: A Survey with Application to Australia

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  • Brown, Allan
  • Cave, Martin

Abstract

The analysis of the regulation of television poses a number of challenges to economists. Because the structure and organization of television broadcasting are rarely the same between any two countries, there are difficulties in applying the economic analysis of television regulation in one country to that of another. Further, the major social and cultural role of television causes government broadcasting policy to include many noneconomic objectives. This paper outlines the main issues concerning the economic regulation of television and relates the prominent literature in the area to the Australian broadcasting environment. Copyright 1992 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Brown, Allan & Cave, Martin, 1992. "The Economics of Television Regulation: A Survey with Application to Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 68(203), pages 377-394, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:68:y:1992:i:203:p:377-94
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McDonald, John, 1999. "A Most Unnatural Unemployment Rate for Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(229), pages 167-170, June.
    2. Douglas Laxton & Guy Meredith & David Rose, 1995. "Asymmetric Effects of Economic Activity on Inflation: Evidence and Policy Implications," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 42(2), pages 344-374, June.
    3. Gruen, David & Pagan, Adrian & Thompson, Christopher, 1999. "The Phillips curve in Australia," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 223-258, October.
    4. de Brouwer, Gordon & Ericsson, Neil R, 1998. "Modeling Inflation in Australia," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 16(4), pages 433-449, October.
    5. Debelle, Guy & Vickery, James, 1998. "Is the Phillips Curve a Curve? Some Evidence and Implications for Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 74(227), pages 384-398, December.
    6. John DiNardo & Mark P. Moore, 1999. "The Phillips Curve is Back? Using Panel Data to Analyze the Relationship Between Unemployment and Inflation in an Open Economy," NBER Working Papers 7328, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1997. "The NAIRU, Unemployment and Monetary Policy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(1), pages 33-49, Winter.
    8. Dupasquier, Chantal & Ricketts, Nicholas, 1998. "Non-Linearities in the Output-Inflation Relationship: Some Empirical Results for Canada," Staff Working Papers 98-14, Bank of Canada.
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    Cited by:

    1. Simon P. Anderson & Stephen Coate, 2000. "Market Provision of Public Goods: The Case of Broadcasting," NBER Working Papers 7513, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Anderson, Simon P. & Gabszewicz, Jean J., 2006. "The Media and Advertising: A Tale of Two-Sided Markets," Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, Elsevier.
    3. Anthony Boardman & Shaun Hargreaves-Heap, 1999. "Network Externalities and Government Restrictions on Satellite Broadcasting of Key Sporting Events," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 23(3), pages 165-179, August.
    4. Simon P. Anderson & Stephen Coate, 2005. "Market Provision of Broadcasting: A Welfare Analysis," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(4), pages 947-972.
    5. Glenn Withers, 2013. "Broadcasting," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Digital Creative Economy, chapter 36, pages 409-415 Edward Elgar Publishing.
      • Glenn Withers, 2003. "Broadcasting," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Cultural Economics, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
      • Glenn Withers & Katrina Alford, 2011. "Broadcasting," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Cultural Economics, Second Edition, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Claude Crampes & Abraham Hollander, 2008. "The regulation of audiovisual content: quotas and conflicting objectives," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 195-219, December.
    7. Alcock, Jamie & Docwra, George, 2005. "A simulation analysis of the market effect of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 407-427, October.
    8. Christian Jansen, 2003. "Convergence and the Potential Ban on Interactive Product Placement in Germany," Law and Economics 0302002, EconWPA.

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