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The Contribution of Intermittent Labour Force Participation to the Gender Wage Differential

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  • Rummery, Sarah

Abstract

Despite equal pay decisions in 1969 and 1972, a gender wage differential of around 15 percent exists in 1990. This paper uses information on the number of years worked from the 1984 National Social Science Survey to provide an understanding of the role of intermittent labor-force participation in the wage-determination process in Australia. Differences in years worked between males and females are shown to account for approximately 40 percent of the gender wage gap. The analyses also reveal that males receive higher returns for each additional year of schooling than females. Copyright 1992 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Rummery, Sarah, 1992. "The Contribution of Intermittent Labour Force Participation to the Gender Wage Differential," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 68(203), pages 351-364, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:68:y:1992:i:203:p:351-64
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    Cited by:

    1. Anh T. Le & Paul W. Miller, 2001. "The Persistence of the Female Wage Disadvantage," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(1), pages 33-52.
    2. Das, Tirthatanmoy & Polachek, Solomon, 2017. "Micro Foundations of Earnings Differences," IZA Discussion Papers 10922, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2003. "Female labor force intermittency and current earnings: a switching regression model with unknown sample selection," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-33, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    4. Dr Sukhan Jackson & Nerina Vecchio, 2002. "Government Policies On Employment And Superannuation: Contradictions And Consequences For Older Australians," Discussion Papers Series 308, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    5. Polachek, Solomon W., 2008. "Earnings Over the Life Cycle: The Mincer Earnings Function and Its Applications," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 4(3), pages 165-272, April.
    6. Swaffield, Joanna, 2000. "Gender, motivation, experience and wages," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20188, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Paul W. Miller, 1994. "Gender Discrimination in Training: An Australian Perspective," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 32(4), pages 539-564, December.
    8. Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Watson, Nicole, 2014. "The impact of measurement error on wage decompositions: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey and the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    9. Mark Wooden, 1999. "Gender Pay Equity and Comparable Worth in Australia: A Reassessment," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(2), pages 157-171.
    10. Meng, Xin, 2004. "Gender earnings gap: the role of firm specific effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(5), pages 555-573, October.
    11. Joanna Swaffield, 2000. "Gender, Motivation, Experience and Wages," CEP Discussion Papers dp0457, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    12. Rummery, Sarah & Vella, Francis & Verbeek, Marno, 1999. "Estimating the returns to education for Australian youth via rank-order instrumental variables," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 491-507, November.
    13. A. Preston, 1996. "Where Are We Now With Human Capital Theory in Australia?," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 96-18, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.

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