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Trade Unions in an Open Economy: A General Equilibrium Analysis

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  • Brecher, Richard A
  • Long, Ngo Van

Abstract

This paper derives a general equilibrium demand-for-labor schedule within the Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson model of a large open economy and then introduces an economywide labor union that maximizes its utility subject to this demand schedule, thereby determining the real wage and, hence, total employment. A parametric shift's comparative-static effects on the equilibrium levels of unemployment and welfare are analyzed within this fully unionized economy. Copyright 1989 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Brecher, Richard A & Long, Ngo Van, 1989. "Trade Unions in an Open Economy: A General Equilibrium Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 65(190), pages 234-239, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:65:y:1989:i:190:p:234-39
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    Cited by:

    1. Chi-Hsin Wu & Chia-Ying Liu, 2010. "Do Trade Unions Deteriorate International Competitiveness? Reconciliation of the Discrepancy Between Theory and Practice," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 38(2), pages 145-155, June.
    2. Donald R. Davis & Trevor A. Reeve, 1997. "Human Capital, Unemployment, and Relative Wages in a Global Economy," NBER Working Papers 6133, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Marianna Belloc, 2009. "International Specialization and Labor Unions: Evidence from OECD Countries," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(1), pages 34-50, February.
    4. Egger, Hartmut & Egger, Peter & Kreickemeier, Udo, 2013. "Trade, wages, and profits," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 332-350.
    5. Leahy, Dermot & Montagna, Catia, 2000. "Unionisation and Foreign Direct Investment: Challenging Conventional Wisdom?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 80-92, March.
    6. Ortega, Daniel & Rodríguez, Francisco, 2001. "Openess and factor shares," Sede de la CEPAL en Santiago (Estudios e Investigaciones) 34855, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    7. Aretz, Bodo & Busl, Claudia & Gürtzgen, Nicole & Hogrefe, Jan & Kappler, Marcus & Steffes, Susanne & Westerheide, Peter, 2009. "Endbericht zum Forschungsauftrag fe 13/08: "Ursachenanalyse der Verschiebung in der funktionalen Einkommensverteilung in Deutschland" (Aktenzeichen I A 3 - Vw 3170/08/10035)," ZEW Expertises, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research, number 110510.
    8. Leahy, Dermot & Montagna, Catia, 1999. "Unionisation and Foreign Direct Investment," CEPR Discussion Papers 2260, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. repec:dun:dpaper:97 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Gaston, Noel & Trefler, Daniel, 1995. "Union wage sensitivity to trade and protection: Theory and evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1-2), pages 1-25, August.

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