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The Youth Labour Market In Australia

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  • Miller, Paul
  • Volker, Paul

Abstract

This paper uses unit record data from the 1985 Australian Longitudinal Survey to review the major features of the youth labor market. Education plays an important role in determining the incidence of unemployment, wages, hours of work, and access to training opportunities. The probability of leaving unemployment falls off substantially as the duration of the unemployment spell increases. Longer-term unemployed appear to be segmented from other labor-market participants. Copyright 1987 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Miller, Paul & Volker, Paul, 1987. "The Youth Labour Market In Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 63(182), pages 203-219, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:63:y:1987:i:182:p:203-19
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    Cited by:

    1. Bernell, Stephanie Lazarus & Shinogle, Judith Ann, 2005. "The relationship between HAART use and employment for HIV-positive individuals: an empirical analysis and policy outlook," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 255-264, February.
    2. Lorraine Dearden & Alexandra Heath, 1996. "Income support and staying in school: what can we learn from Australia's AUSTUDY experiment?," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 17(4), pages 1-30, November.
    3. Grace Chia & Paul W. Miller, 2008. "Tertiary Performance, Field of Study and Graduate Starting Salaries," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 41(1), pages 15-31, March.
    4. Dex S., 1992. "Costs of discriminating against migrant workers : an international review," ILO Working Papers 992869403402676, International Labour Organization.
    5. repec:ilo:ilowps:286940 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Overman, Henry G. & Heath, Alex, 2000. "The influence of neighbourhood effects on education decisions in a nationally funded education system : the case of Australia," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 678, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Jeff Borland, 2000. "Disaggregated Models of Unemployment in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2000n16, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    8. P.W. Miller & C. Mulvey, 1989. "Union Density and the Union/Non-Union Wage Differential in Australia," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 89-17, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    9. Barry R. Chiswick & Yew Liang Lee & Paul W. Miller, 2005. "Immigrant Earnings: A Longitudinal Analysis," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 51(4), pages 485-503, December.
    10. Peter Dawkins & Paul Gregg & Rosanna Scutella, 2002. "The Growth of Jobless Households in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 35(2), pages 133-154.
    11. Vella, Francis & Gregory, R. G., 1996. "Selection bias and human capital investment: Estimating the rates of return to education for young males," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 197-219, September.

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