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The Enforcement of Income Tax Laws: Efficiency Implications


  • Baldry, J C


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Suggested Citation

  • Baldry, J C, 1984. "The Enforcement of Income Tax Laws: Efficiency Implications," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 60(169), pages 156-159, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:60:y:1984:i:169:p:156-59

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ángel Marcos Vera-Hernández, 1999. "Duplicate coverage and demand for health care. The case of Catalonia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(7), pages 579-598.
    2. Alfons Palangkaraya & Jongsay Yong, 2007. "How effective is “lifetime health cover” in raising private health insurance coverage in Australia? An assessment using regression discontinuity," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(11), pages 1361-1374.
    3. H.E. Frech Iii & Sandra Hopkins & Garry Macdonald, 2003. "The Australian Private Health Insurance Boom: Was It Subsidies Or Liberalised Regulation?," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 22(1), pages 58-64, March.
    4. Cameron, A. Colin & Trivedi, Pravin K., 1991. "The role of income and health risk in the choice of health insurance : Evidence from Australia," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 1-28, June.
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Kopczuk, Wojciech, 2001. "Redistribution when avoidance behavior is heterogeneous," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 51-71, July.
    2. Iskandar, Deden Dinar & Wuenscher, Tobias, 2012. "Finding the Stronger Impact among Bribery, Financial Reward, and Religious Attitude: The Insights of Experiment on Environmental Tax Compliance in Indonesia," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Freemantle, Australia 124316, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Slemrod, Joel & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 2002. "Tax avoidance, evasion, and administration," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 22, pages 1423-1470 Elsevier.
    4. repec:spr:joecth:v:63:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00199-016-0976-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Lewis, Alan & Carrera, Sonia & Cullis, John & Jones, Philip, 2009. "Individual, cognitive and cultural differences in tax compliance: UK and Italy compared," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 431-445, June.
    6. Sokolovskyi, Dmytro & Sokolovska, Olena, 2016. "Tax burden optimization on economic agents by modeling interaction in the taxation system," MPRA Paper 71110, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 May 2016.
    7. Joel Slemrod, 2007. "Cheating Ourselves: The Economics of Tax Evasion," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 25-48, Winter.
    8. Kalina Koleva, 2005. "A la recherche de l'administration fiscale optimale : l'approche par les coûts d'efficience," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques r05050, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
    9. James, Simon & Edwards, Alison, 2010. "An annotated bibliography of tax compliance and tax compliance costs," MPRA Paper 26106, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Cullis, John & Jones, Philip & Savoia, Antonio, 2012. "Social norms and tax compliance: Framing the decision to pay tax," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 159-168.

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