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Deliveries on Commodity Futures Contracts


  • Peck, Anne E
  • Williams, Jeffrey C


Deliveries on futures contracts are widely thought to be relatively insignificant in amount; indeed, sizeable deliveries are taken to indicate problems in a futures market. In fact, deliveries on five of the largest, physical delivery, futures markets in the United States average approximately 10 percent of the maximum open interest in each delivery month. Analysis also demonstrated the value of the timing and location options often provided by contract specifications. One implication is that measures of market performance like hedging effectiveness are sensitive to the imbedded options' effects on prices. Copyright 1992 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Peck, Anne E & Williams, Jeffrey C, 1992. "Deliveries on Commodity Futures Contracts," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 0(0), pages 63-74, Supplemen.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:0:y:1992:i:0:p:63-74

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2004. "Well-being over time in Britain and the USA," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1359-1386, July.
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    4. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, 2002. "What Can Economists Learn from Happiness Research?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 402-435, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dummu, Tata Rao, 2009. "Commodity Futures Markets in India: Its Impact on Production and Prices," Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Indian Society of Agricultural Economics, vol. 64(3).
    2. Bharat Ramaswami & Jatinder Bir Singh, 2006. "Underdeveloped spot markets and futures trading: The Soya Oil exchange in India," Indian Statistical Institute, Planning Unit, New Delhi Discussion Papers 06-03, Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India.

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