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The Return on Post-compulsory School Mathematics Study


  • Dolton, P J
  • Vignoles, A


What are the essential skills learned at school that are required for the labour market? The issue is particularly policy relevant in the UK, where the 16-19 secondary school curriculum (A levels) is undergoing major reform. This paper uses data from the UK to investigate the impact of different academic subjects in secondary school on pupils' subsequent earning, particularly the impact of studying advanced mathematical curricula. We find that individuals with an advanced (A-level) mathematics qualification earn 7%-10% more than similarly educated workers without this qualification, even after controlling for the initial ability of these individuals. Copyright 2002 by The London School of Economics and Political Science

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  • Dolton, P J & Vignoles, A, 2002. "The Return on Post-compulsory School Mathematics Study," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(273), pages 113-141, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:69:y:2002:i:273:p:113-41

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Joseph G. Altonji & Thomas A. Dunn, 1995. "The Effects of School and Family Characteristics on the Return to Education," NBER Working Papers 5072, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Robertson, Donald & Symons, James, 1990. "The Occupational Choice of British Children," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(402), pages 828-841, September.
    3. Donald Robertson & James Symons, 2003. "Self-selection in the state school system," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 259-272.
    4. Betts, Julian R, 1995. "Does School Quality Matter? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 231-250, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Leping, Kristian-Olari & Toomet, Ott, 2008. "Emerging ethnic wage gap: Estonia during political and economic transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 599-619, December.
    2. Burgess, Simon & Metcalfe, Robert & Sadoff, Sally, 2016. "Understanding the Response to Financial and Non-Financial Incentives in Education: Field Experimental Evidence Using High-Stakes Assessments," IZA Discussion Papers 10284, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Mark Bailey & Vani Borooah, 2010. "What enhances mathematical ability? A cross-country analysis based on test scores of 15-year-olds," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(29), pages 3723-3733.
    4. Kristjan-Olari Leping & Ott Toomet, 2007. "Ethnic Wage Gap And Political Break-Ups: Estonia During Political And Economic Transition," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 53, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    5. Geoff Mason, 2014. "Skills and training for a more innovation-intensive economy," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 431, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

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