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Risk, Optimal Government Finance and Monetary Policies in a Growing Economy


  • Grinols, Earl L
  • Turnovsky, Stephen J


Optimal tax and monetary policies in a stochastic monetary growth model are investigated. The authors' findings are of three general types. First, both capital income taxes and monetary growth are shown to influence the economy through effective risk-adjusted measures, expressed as a linear function of their respective means and variances. Second, two stochastic neutrality results relating to money and bonds, the two nominal assets in the economy, are identified. Third, optimal policy rules relating to taxes, bond finance, and money creation are characterized. An essential component of optimal financial policy is a risk-adjusted balanced budget. Copyright 1998 by The London School of Economics and Political Science

Suggested Citation

  • Grinols, Earl L & Turnovsky, Stephen J, 1998. "Risk, Optimal Government Finance and Monetary Policies in a Growing Economy," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(259), pages 401-427, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:65:y:1998:i:259:p:401-27

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1969. "Distribution of Income and Wealth among Individuals," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 382-397, July.
    2. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    3. Galor, Oded & Tsiddon, Daniel, 1997. "The Distribution of Human Capital and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 93-124, March.
    4. Loury, Glenn C, 1981. "Intergenerational Transfers and the Distribution of Earnings," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 843-867, June.
    5. Chatterjee, Satyajit, 1994. "Transitional dynamics and the distribution of wealth in a neoclassical growth model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 97-119, May.
    6. Bourguignon, Francois, 1981. "Pareto Superiority of Unegalitarian Equilibria in Stiglitz' Model of Wealth Distribution with Convex Saving Function," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1469-1475, November.
    7. Durlauf, Steven N, 1996. "A Theory of Persistent Income Inequality," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 75-93, March.
    8. Zimmerman, David J, 1992. "Regression toward Mediocrity in Economic Stature," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 409-429, June.
    9. Masao Ogaki & Andrew Atkeson, 1997. "Rate Of Time Preference, Intertemporal Elasticity Of Substitution, And Level Of Wealth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 564-572, November.
    10. Thomas Piketty, 1997. "The Dynamics of the Wealth Distribution and the Interest Rate with Credit Rationing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(2), pages 173-189.
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    Cited by:

    1. Turnovsky, Stephen J. & Chattopadhyay, Pradip, 2003. "Volatility and growth in developing economies: some numerical results and empirical evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 267-295, March.
    2. Ratbek Dzhumashev, 2007. "Corruption, Uncertainty And Growth," Monash Economics Working Papers 15-07, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    3. Garcia-Penalosa, Cecilia & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2005. "Production risk and the functional distribution of income in a developing economy: tradeoffs and policy responses," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 175-208, February.
    4. Giuliano, Paola & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2003. "Intertemporal substitution, risk aversion, and economic performance in a stochastically growing open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 529-556, August.
    5. Pommeret, Aude & Smith, William T., 2005. "Fertility, volatility, and growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 87(3), pages 347-353, June.
    6. Djumashev, R, 2007. "Corruption, uncertainty and growth," MPRA Paper 3716, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Stephen Turnovsky & Marcelo Bianconi, "undated". "The Welfare Gains from Stabilization in a Stochastically Growing Economy with Idiosyncratic Shocks and Flexible Labor Supply," Working Papers UWEC-2004-08-P, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    8. Wälde, Klaus, 2011. "Production technologies in stochastic continuous time models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 616-622, April.
    9. Stilianos Fountas & Menelaos Karanasos, 2008. "Are economic growth and the variability of the business cycle related? Evidence from five European countries," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(4), pages 445-459.
    10. Gong, Liutang & Zou, Heng-fu, 2012. "Risk-taking, fiscal policies, asset pricing, and stochastic growth with the spirit of capitalism," MPRA Paper 37426, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Dzhumashev, Ratbek, 2008. "Corruption and Disposable Risk," MPRA Paper 11772, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models


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