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Inequality in Five Countries in the 1980s: The Role of Demographic Shifts, Markets and Government Policies


  • Jantti, Markus


This paper uses Luxembourg Income Study data to examine levels of and trends in income inequality in Canada, the Netherlands, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Inequality increased in Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States but did not increase in Canada and the Netherlands. Increased inequality of household head's earnings and increased shares of spouse's earnings in family income account for much of the observed increases in income inequality. The public sector can, in general, be assigned a moderating effect on these changes. Demographic shifts are not assigned any major role in inequality changes. Copyright 1997 by The London School of Economics and Political Science

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  • Jantti, Markus, 1997. "Inequality in Five Countries in the 1980s: The Role of Demographic Shifts, Markets and Government Policies," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(255), pages 415-440, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:64:y:1997:i:255:p:415-40

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Fräßdorf & Markus M. Grabka & Johannes Schwarze, 2008. "The impact of household capital income on income inequality: A factor decomposition analysis for Great Britain, Germany and the USA," Working Papers 89, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Ivica Urban, 2014. "Contributions of taxes and benefits to vertical and horizontal effects," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 42(3), pages 619-645, March.
    3. Sullström, Risto & Loikkanen, Heikki A. & Rantala, Anssi, 1998. "Regional Income Differences in Finland, 1966-96," Discussion Papers 181, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Ardagna, Silvia, 2007. "Fiscal policy in unionized labor markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 1498-1534, May.
    5. Wang, Xinxin & Chen, Kevin Z. & Robinson, Sherman & Huang, Zuhui, 2016. "Will China’s demographic transition exacerbate its income inequality? A CGE modeling with top-down microsimulation:," IFPRI discussion papers 1560, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Frick, Joachim R. & Grabka, Markus M., 2009. "Accounting for Imputed and Capital Income Flows in Income Inequality Analyses," IZA Discussion Papers 4634, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Paweenawat, Sasiwimon Warunsiri & McNown, Robert, 2014. "The determinants of income inequality in Thailand: A synthetic cohort analysis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31, pages 10-21.
    8. Zhong, Hai, 2011. "The impact of population aging on income inequality in developing countries: Evidence from rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 98-107, March.
    9. Grabka, Markus M. & Schwarze, Johannes & Wagner, Gert G., 1999. "How Unification and Immigration Affected the German Income Distribution," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 867-878.
    10. Biewen, Martin, 2002. "Bootstrap inference for inequality, mobility and poverty measurement," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 317-342, June.
    11. Ardagna, Silvia, 2007. "Fiscal Policy in Unionized Labor Markets," Scholarly Articles 2580048, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    12. Chi, Wei, 2012. "Capital income and income inequality: Evidence from urban China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 228-239.
    13. Alimi, Omoniyi & Maré, Dave C. & Poot, Jacques, 2017. "More Pensioners, Less Income Inequality? The Impact of Changing Age Composition on Inequality in Big Cities and Elsewhere," IZA Discussion Papers 10690, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Omoniyi B Alimi & David C Maré & Jacques Poot, 2017. "More pensioners, less income inequality?," Working Papers 17_02, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.

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