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Staying on in Full-Time Education: The Education Participation Rate of 16-Year-Olds

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  • Whitfield, Keith
  • Wilson, R A

Abstract

This paper presents a time-series analysis of the socioeconomic factors influencing the propensity of sixteen-year-olds to stay on in full-time education in England and Wales. The econometric methodology employed relies on cointegration and "general to specific" techniques. The results suggest that the main factors influencing staying on are the rate of return to education, changing social class structure, unemployment rates, and the introduction of special employment and training measures such as the Youth Training Scheme. Copyright 1991 by The London School of Economics and Political Science.

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  • Whitfield, Keith & Wilson, R A, 1991. "Staying on in Full-Time Education: The Education Participation Rate of 16-Year-Olds," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 58(231), pages 391-404, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:58:y:1991:i:231:p:391-404
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    Cited by:

    1. Elvana Hana & Arsena Gjipali, 2010. "What Determines Upper Secondary School Participation? - Intergenerational Effects Of Education Outcomes In Albania," Journal Articles, Center For Economic Analyses, pages 17-31, June.
    2. David Armstrong & Duncan McVicar, 2000. "Value added in further education and vocational training in Northern Ireland," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(13), pages 1727-1736.
    3. Bercholz, Maxime & FitzGerald, John, 2016. "Recent Trends in Female Labour Force Participation in Ireland," Quarterly Economic Commentary: Special Articles, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    4. Setsuya Fukuda, 2009. "Leaving the parental home in post-war Japan," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 20(30), pages 731-816, June.
    5. Borghans, Lex & De Grip, Andries & Heijke, Hans, 1996. "Labor market information and the choice of vocational specialization," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 59-74, February.
    6. Pastore, Francesco, 2005. "To Study or to Work? Education and Labour Market Participation of Young People in Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 1793, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Namkee Ahn & Arantza Ugidos, 1996. "The effects of the labor market situation of parents on children: inheritance of unemployment," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 20(1), pages 23-41, January.
    8. Steven McIntosh, 2001. "The Demand for Post-Compulsory Education in Four European Countries," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(1), pages 69-90.
    9. Binder, Melissa, 1999. "Schooling indicators during Mexico's "Lost decade"," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 183-199, April.
    10. Rice, P., 2002. "The great divide: regional differences in education and training," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 201, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    11. Alberto Tumino, 2013. "The effect of local labour market conditions on educational choices: a cross country comparison," ImPRovE Working Papers 13/06, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    12. Setsuya Fukuda, 2010. "Leaving the parental home in post-war Japan: social, economic and demographic determinants," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2010-007, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    13. Autar Dhesi, 2002. "Expected Life-earnings Paths with and without Higher Education: The case of India," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 417-433.
    14. Regina T. Riphahn, 2010. "Residential Location and Youth Unemployment: The Economic Geography of School-To-Work," Working Papers id:2648, eSocialSciences.
    15. Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz Gonzalez & Quintana, Delia Davila, 1998. "Economic and Cultural Impediments to University Education in Spain," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 93-103, February.

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