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The Employment of Married Women in the United Kingdom 1970-83

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  • Gomulka, Joanna
  • Stern, Nicholas

Abstract

The proportion of married women in employment in the United Kingdom grew rapidly during the 1970s, rising from around 50 to 60 percent. The paper investigates this change using a time series of cross sections from the Family Expenditure Survey. An attempt is made to assess how much of the change was due to trends in the observable characteristics of the population and what part was played by changes in behavioral and other factors reflected in the coefficients of the model. A technique of growth accounting is proposed and used to this purpose. Copyright 1990 by The London School of Economics and Political Science.

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  • Gomulka, Joanna & Stern, Nicholas, 1990. "The Employment of Married Women in the United Kingdom 1970-83," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 57(226), pages 171-199, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:57:y:1990:i:226:p:171-99
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    1. Carlos Gradín, 2012. "Poverty among minorities in the United States: explaining the racial poverty gap for Blacks and Latinos," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(29), pages 3793-3804, October.
    2. E. Anthon Eff & Steven G. Livingston, 2007. "Is There A Rural/Urban Export Gap?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 339-363.
    3. Olanrewaju Olaniyan, 2011. "The Determinants of Child Schooling in Nigeria," Research Papers RP_217, African Economic Research Consortium.
    4. Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo & José-Ignacio Antón, 2011. "From Rags to Riches? Immigration and Poverty in Spain," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(5), pages 661-676, October.
    5. Pylypchuk, Yuriy & Selden, Thomas M., 2008. "A discrete choice decomposition analysis of racial and ethnic differences in children's health insurance coverage," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 1109-1128, July.
    6. Fortin, Nicole & Lemieux, Thomas & Firpo, Sergio, 2011. "Decomposition Methods in Economics," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    7. Prabir C. Bhattacharya & Vibhor Saxena, 2015. "Discrimination in Accessing Cleaner Cooking Fuels and Electricity in North India: The Role of Caste, Tribe, and Religion," Heriot-Watt University Economics Discussion Papers 1502, Department of Economics, School of Management and Languages, Heriot Watt University.
    8. Schnepf, Sylke Viola, 2006. "Gender equality in the labour market: Attitudes to women's work," HWWI Research Papers 1-4, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    9. Biewen, Martin, 2012. "Additive Decompositions with Interaction Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 6730, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Ken Clark & Stephen Drinkwater, 2014. "Labour migration to the UK from Eastern partnership countries," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-19, December.
    11. Piracha, Matloob & Randazzo, Teresa & Vadean, Florin, 2013. "Remittances and Occupational Outcomes of the Household Members Left-Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 7582, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Vibhor Saxena & P.C. Bhattacharya, 2015. "Inequalities in accessing LPG and electricity consumption in India: The role of caste, tribe, and religion," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 201512, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews, revised 25 Jun 2017.
    13. Stephan L. Thomsen, 2009. "Explaining the Employability Gap of Short-Term and Long-Term Unemployed Persons," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(3), pages 448-478, August.
    14. Manfred Te Grotenhuis & Rob Eisinga & Peer Scheepers, 2004. "The Method of Purging Applied to Repeated Cross-Sectional Data," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 1-16, February.
    15. John Schmitt & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2002. "Give PCs a Chance: Personal Computer Ownership and the Digital Divide in the United States and Great Britain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0526, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    16. Emanuela Ghignoni, 2015. "Family background and university dropouts during the crisis: the case of Italy," Working Papers 169, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    17. Patrizia Luongo, 2010. "Inequality of Opportunity in the Labour Market Entry of Graduates in Italy," SERIES 0030, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza - Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", revised May 2010.

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