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Wage Movements and the Labour Market Equilibrium Hypothesis

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  • Altonji, Joseph
  • Ashenfelter, Orley

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  • Altonji, Joseph & Ashenfelter, Orley, 1980. "Wage Movements and the Labour Market Equilibrium Hypothesis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 47(187), pages 217-245, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:47:y:1980:i:187:p:217-45
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    Cited by:

    1. Blinder, Alan S, 1988. "The Challenge of High Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 1-15, May.
    2. Duo Qin, 2010. "Modelling of the Inflation-Unemployment Tradeoff from the Perspective of the History of Econometrics," Working Papers 661, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    3. Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1995. "Individual Income, Incomplete Information, and Aggregate Consumption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 63(4), pages 805-840, July.
    4. Francisco J. Goerlich Gisbert, 1992. "Un test alternativo de la hipótesis de sustitución intertemporal del trabajo," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 16(2), pages 259-280, May.
    5. Bernanke, Ben S, 1986. "Employment, Hours, and Earnings in the Depression: An Analysis of EightManufacturing Industries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(1), pages 82-109, March.
    6. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1983. "New Measures of Labor Cost: Implications for Demand Elasticities and Nominal Wage Growth," NBER Chapters,in: The Measurement of Labor Cost, pages 287-308 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Boldrin, Michael & Horvath, Michael, 1995. "Labor Contracts and Business Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 972-1004, October.
    8. Ben S. Bernanke & James Powell, 1986. "The Cyclical Behavior of Industrial Labor Markets: A Comparison of the Prewar and Postwar Eras," NBER Chapters,in: The American Business Cycle: Continuity and Change, pages 583-638 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Hajivassiliou, 1993. "Macroeconomic Shocks in an Aggregative Disequilibrium Model," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1063, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    10. Blank, Rebecca M, 1990. "Why Are Wages Cyclical in the 1970s?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages 16-47, January.
    11. Blank, Rebecca M, 1989. "Disaggregating the Effect of the Business Cycle on the Distribution of Income," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 56(222), pages 141-163, May.
    12. Gary Solon & Robert Barsky & Jonathan A. Parker, 1994. "Measuring the Cyclicality of Real Wages: How Important is Composition Bias?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 1-25.
    13. Victor Zarnowitz, 1984. "Recent Work on Business Cycles in Historical Perspective: Review of Theories and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 1503, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Ashenfelter, Orley, 1984. "Macroeconomic analyses and microeconomic analyses of labor supply," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 117-156, January.
    15. Horvath, Michael, 2000. "Sectoral shocks and aggregate fluctuations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 69-106, February.
    16. Orley Ashenfelter, 1983. "The Withering away of a Full Employment Goal," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 9(1), pages 114-125, March.
    17. Willem H. Buiter, 1981. "Macroeconometric Modelling for Policy Evaluation and Design," NBER Technical Working Papers 0013, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Fleissig, Adrian R. & Strauss, Jack, 1997. "Unit root tests on real wage panel data for the G7," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 149-155, October.

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