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Linking Local Government Discretion and Accountability in Decentralisation

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  • Serdar Yilmaz
  • Yakup Beris
  • Rodrigo Serrano-Berthet

Abstract

Decentralisation offers significant opportunities to improve government accountability by exerting stronger pressures both from below (demand) and above (supply). The literature contains many examples, however, where the potential has not been realised, partly because decentralisation reforms have often been introduced without thinking through their accountability implications. Even when accountability is taken into account, the efforts tend to emphasise either the supply or the demand side of the equation, but not both. Drawing on the sets of literature on fiscal, administrative and political decentralisation, this article presents a methodology for studying this. Copyright (c) The Authors 2010. Journal compilation (c) 2010 Overseas Development Institute..

Suggested Citation

  • Serdar Yilmaz & Yakup Beris & Rodrigo Serrano-Berthet, 2010. "Linking Local Government Discretion and Accountability in Decentralisation," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 28(3), pages 259-293, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:28:y:2010:i:3:p:259-293
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    Cited by:

    1. Leonardo Romeo & Paul Smoke, 2014. "The Political Economy of Local Infrastructure Planning," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1417, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    2. Niamh Gaynor, 2014. "Bringing the Citizen Back In: Supporting Decentralisation in Fragile States - A View from Burundi," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(2), pages 203-218, March.
    3. Smoke, Paul, 2016. "Looking Beyond Conventional Intergovernmental Fiscal Frameworks: Principles, Realities, and Neglected Issues," ADBI Working Papers 606, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    4. Carlitz, Ruth D., 2017. "Money Flows, Water Trickles: Understanding Patterns of Decentralized Water Provision in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 16-30.
    5. Kengo, Igei & Takako, Yuki & Angela Demas, 2015. "Measuring Quality of Policies and Their Implementation for Better Learning: Adapting the World Bank’s SABER Tools School Autonomy and Accountability to Burkina Faso," Working Papers 109, JICA Research Institute.
    6. Mohammed, Abrar Juhar & Inoue, Makoto, 2014. "Linking outputs and outcomes from devolved forest governance using a Modified Actor-Power-Accountability Framework (MAPAF): Case study from Chilimo forest, Ethiopia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 21-31.

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