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Engagement with Non-State Service Providers in Fragile States: Reconciling State-Building and Service Delivery

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  • Richard Batley
  • Claire Mcloughlin

Abstract

The OECD questions whether non-state services in fragile states may delegitimise the state in the eyes of citizens, arguing that 'state-building' depends on governments' engagement in service management. This article reviews the available evidence to identify what types of engagement are feasible and most likely to contribute to service delivery, or not to damage it. It considers the capacity requirements and the risks associated with state intervention through policy formulation, regulation, contracting and mutual agreements, and concludes by identifying ways of incrementally involving the state, beginning with activities that are least likely to do harm to non-state provision. Copyright (c) The Authors 2010. Journal compilation (c) 2010 Overseas Development Institute..

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Batley & Claire Mcloughlin, 2010. "Engagement with Non-State Service Providers in Fragile States: Reconciling State-Building and Service Delivery," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 28(2), pages 131-154, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:28:y:2010:i:2:p:131-154
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    Cited by:

    1. Jennings, Michael, 2015. "The precariousness of the franchise state: Voluntary sector health services and international NGOs in Tanzania, 1960s – mid-1980s," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 1-8.
    2. World Bank Group, 2014. "Strategic Framework for Mainstreaming Citizen Engagement in World Bank Group Operations," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21113, January.
    3. Wodon, Quentin, 2013. "Faith-inspired, Private Secular, and Public Schools in sub-Saharan Africa: Market Share, Reach to the Poor, Cost, and Satisfaction," MPRA Paper 45363, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Badru Bukenya, 2013. "Are service-delivery NGOs building state capacity in the global South? Experiences from HIV/AIDS programmes in rural Uganda," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-022-13, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    5. Witter, Sophie, 2012. "Health financing in fragile and post-conflict states: What do we know and what are the gaps?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(12), pages 2370-2377.
    6. Axel Dreher & Valentin F. Lang & Sebastian Ziaja, 2017. "Foreign Aid in Areas of Limited Statehood," CESifo Working Paper Series 6340, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Elizabeth Dávid-Barrett & Vladimir Gligorov & Jelena Krstić, 2016. "Corruption Risk and Legitimacy in Outsourced Public Service Provision: Evidence from Serbia," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 120, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    8. Roni Factor & Minah Kang, 2015. "Corruption and population health outcomes: an analysis of data from 133 countries using structural equation modeling," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(6), pages 633-641, September.
    9. Roger C. Riddell, 2013. "Assessing the Overall Impact of Civil Society on Development at the Country Level: An Exploratory Approach," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 31(4), pages 371-396, July.
    10. Arjan de Haan & Ward Warmerdam, 2012. "The politics of aid revisited: a review of evidence on state capacity and elite commitment," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-007-12, GDI, The University of Manchester.

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