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Innovations to Make Markets More Inclusive for the Poor


  • Ronald U. Mendoza
  • Nina Thelen


Market failures, government failures and some of the characteristics of both the poor and business actors as well as their environment can act as barriers preventing the poor from participating more actively in markets, both as consumers and as producers. Private actors - including for-profit and not-for-profit entities, often in partnership with the public sector - have been able to mitigate some of these constraints through innovations that have helped to make markets more inclusive for the poor, enabling them not just to gain access, but also to participate in ways that enhance their economic empowerment and human development. This article identifies the strategies and innovations used and devises a possible typology for them. Copyright (c) The Authors 2008. Journal compilation (c) 2008 Overseas Development Institute..

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  • Ronald U. Mendoza & Nina Thelen, 2008. "Innovations to Make Markets More Inclusive for the Poor," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 26(4), pages 427-458, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:26:y:2008:i:4:p:427-458

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    Cited by:

    1. Meagher, Kate & Manna, Laura & Bolt, Maxim, 2016. "Introduction: Globalization, African Workers and the Terms of Inclusion," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66276, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:30:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1057_s41287-017-0113-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Edo Andriesse, 2009. "Balancing private sector development and local-central relations," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 16(1), pages 93-114, June.
    4. Ramani, Shyama & SadreGhazi, Shuan & Duysters, Geert, 2010. "On the Delivery of Pro-Poor Innovations: Managerial Lessons from Sanitation Activists in India," MERIT Working Papers 018, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    5. Meagher, Kate, 2015. "Leaving no-one behind? Informal economies, economic inclusion, and Islamic extremism in Nigeria," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 62140, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Joshua K Ault, 2016. "An institutional perspective on the social outcome of entrepreneurship: Commercial microfinance and inclusive markets," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 47(8), pages 951-967, October.
    7. Richard A. Duncombe, 2014. "Understanding the Impact of Mobile Phones on Livelihoods in Developing Countries," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(5), pages 567-588, September.
    8. Acosta, Pablo & Kim, Namsuk & Melzer, Illana & Mendoza, Ronald U. & Thelen, Nina, 2011. "Business and human development in the base of the pyramid: Exploring challenges and opportunities with market heat maps," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 50-60, January.
    9. Bokelmann, Wolfgang & Adamseged, Muluken E., 2016. "Contributing to a better understanding of the value chain framework in developing countries," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 249334, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    10. Manoj Roy & Simon Guy & David Hulme & Ferdous Jahan, 2011. "Poverty and climate change in urban Bangladesh (CLIMURB): an analytical framework," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 14811, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    11. Manoj Roy & Ferdous Jahan & David Hulme, 2012. "Community and institutional responses to the challenges facing poor urban people in Khulna, Bangladesh in an era of climate change," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 16312, BWPI, The University of Manchester.

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