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The Bangladesh Health SWAp: Experience of a New Aid Instrument in Practice


  • Howard White


Sector-wide approaches are being widely adopted as a new aid modality, incorporating government ownership, partnership and a move from project to programme support. The literature to date on their performance in practice is, at best, mixed. This article reviews these issues in the light of the experience of arguably the world's oldest and largest SWAp, the Bangladesh health sector programme. A positive picture emerges of an evolutionary institutional adaptation towards a programme approach, with positive systemic effects on government processes and a reduction in transaction costs in dealing with donors. There are, however, negative aspects, notably, donor dominance in 'dialogue', though with limited influence on the government's actual strategy. Copyright 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Howard White, 2007. "The Bangladesh Health SWAp: Experience of a New Aid Instrument in Practice," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 25(4), pages 451-472, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:25:y:2007:i:4:p:451-472

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew McNee, 2012. "Rethinking Health Sector Wide Approaches through the lens of Aid Effectiveness," Development Policy Centre Discussion Papers 1214, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Acharya, Arnab & Martínez-Álvarez, Melisa, 2012. "Aid Effectiveness in the Health Sector," WIDER Working Paper Series 069, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-69 is not listed on IDEAS

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