IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Cash or Food Aid? A General Equilibrium Analysis for Ethiopia


  • Ayele Gelan


This article examines the relative effectiveness of cash and in-kind food aid, using an economy-wide modelling framework and a social accounting matrix constructed for Ethiopia. It argues that cash aid has larger positive effects on household welfare, with multiplier effects on households other than direct recipients, and that food aid provides a disincentive to local food production. However, where cash transfers cause food prices to rise, welfare losses may be suffered by those who are neither targeted nor beneficiaries. The highly aggregated nature of the model allows only a tentative policy recommendation in favour of cash transfers. Copyright 2006 Overseas Development Institute.

Suggested Citation

  • Ayele Gelan, 2006. "Cash or Food Aid? A General Equilibrium Analysis for Ethiopia," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 24(5), pages 601-624, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:24:y:2006:i:5:p:601-624

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-766, May.
    2. Jean-Marc Montaud, 2003. "Dotations en capital et pauvreté des ménages au Burkina Faso : une analyse en Équilibre Général Calculable," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 11(1), pages 43-71.
    3. Dorothée Boccanfuso & Bernard Decaluwé & Luc Savard, 2003. "Poverty, Income Distribution and CGE Modeling: Does the Functional Form of Distribution Matter?," Cahiers de recherche 0332, CIRPEE.
    4. BUSSOLO Maurizio & LAY Jann, "undated". "Globalization and Poverty Changes in Colombia," EcoMod2003 330700029, EcoMod.
    5. Decaluwe, B. & Patry, A. & Savard, L. & Thorbecke, E., 1999. "Poverty Analysis Within a General Equilibrium Framework," Cahiers de recherche 9909, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
    6. Jean-Marc Montaud, 2000. "Dotations en capital et pauvreté des ménages au Burkina Faso : une analyse en équilibre général calculable," Documents de travail 50, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Villegas, Laura & Smith, Vincent H. & Atwood, Joe & Belasco, Eric, 2. "Does Participation In Public Works Programs Encourage Fertilizer Use In Rural Ethiopia?," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 4(2).
    2. Nathalie Ferrière & Akiko Suwa-Eisenmann, 2014. "Does food aid disrupt local food market? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," FOODSECURE Working papers 26, LEI Wageningen UR.
    3. Caria, A. Stefano & Tamru, Seneshaw & Bizuneh, Gera, 2011. "Food security without food transfers?: A CGE analysis for Ethiopia of the different food security impacts of fertilizer subsidies and locally sourced food transfers," IFPRI discussion papers 1106, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Mariano, Marc Jim M. & Giesecke, James A., 2014. "The macroeconomic and food security implications of price interventions in the Philippine rice market," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 350-361.
    5. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i::p:o303-o321 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Caria, A. Stefano & Tamru, Seneshaw & Bizuneh, Gera, 2011. "Food security without food transfers?: A CGE analysis for Ethiopia of the different food security impacts of fertilizer subsidies and locally sourced food transfers," ESSP working papers 29, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Nguyen Viet Cuong, 2013. "The Impact of Social Security on Household Welfare: Evidence from a Transition Country," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 25(5), pages 737-757, December.
    8. Ferrière, Nathalie & Suwa-Eisenmann, Akiko, 2015. "Does Food Aid Disrupt Local Food Market? Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 114-131.
    9. Villa, Juan M., 2014. "Social transfers and growth: The missing evidence from luminosity data," WIDER Working Paper Series 090, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    10. Jeni Klugman, 2007. "Ethiopia : Explaining Food Price Inflation," World Bank Other Operational Studies 19539, The World Bank.
    11. Sabates-Wheeler, Rachel & Devereux, Stephen, 2010. "Cash transfers and high food prices: Explaining outcomes on Ethiopia's Productive Safety Net Programme," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 274-285, August.
    12. Wodon, Quentin & Zaman, Hassan, 2008. "Rising food prices in Sub-Saharan Africa : poverty impact and policy responses," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4738, The World Bank.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:24:y:2006:i:5:p:601-624. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.