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Analysing Macro-Poverty Linkages: An Overview

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  • Bernhard G. Gunter
  • Marc J. Cohen
  • Hans Lofgren

Abstract

The analysis of macro-poverty linkages has emerged as an important but contentious area of national and international policy-making. Over the last few years, considerable progress has been made in understanding the linkages between macroeconomic policies and poverty reduction, as well as in developing evaluation tools and methodologies useful in conducting ex-ante PSIAs of macro policies. Nevertheless, while there are some reasons for optimism about the future, the potential contribution of these insights and tools to poverty reduction is largely unfulfilled. This article provides an introduction to this theme issue on 'Analysing Macro-Poverty Linkages' by reviewing (i) macroeconomic policy debates and (ii) methods and tools for evaluating the impact of macro policies on poverty. Copyright Overseas Development Institute, 2005.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernhard G. Gunter & Marc J. Cohen & Hans Lofgren, 2005. "Analysing Macro-Poverty Linkages: An Overview," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 23(3), pages 243-265, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:23:y:2005:i:3:p:243-265
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mwangi S. Kimenyi, 2006. "Economic Reforms and Pro-Poor Growth: Lessons for Africa and other Developing Regions and Economies in Transition," Working papers 2006-02, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    2. Vaqar Ahmed & Cathal O'Donoghue, 2010. "External Shocks in a Small Open Economy: A CGE - Microsimulation Analysis," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 15(1), pages 45-90, Jan-Jun.
    3. Behrman, Jere R., 2009. "Analyzing the Distributional Impact of Reforms, Volume Two: A Practitioner's Guide to Pension, Health, Labor Market, Public Sector Downsizing, Taxation, Decentralization, and Macroeconomic Modeling. A," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(03), pages 396-397, July.
    4. Akanbi, Olusegun A. & Du Toit, Charlotte B., 2011. "Macro-econometric modelling for the Nigerian economy: A growth–poverty gap analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 335-350.
    5. Oberdabernig, Doris A., 2013. "Revisiting the Effects of IMF Programs on Poverty and Inequality," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 113-142.
    6. Ramos Mabugu & Margaret Chitiga, 2009. "Liberalising Trade In South Africa: A Survey Of Computable General Equilibrium Studies," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 77(3), pages 445-464, September.
    7. AfDB AfDB, 2006. "Working Paper 86 - A Review of Ex - ante Poverty Impact Assessments of Macroeconomic Policies in Cameroon and Ghana," Working Paper Series 2300, African Development Bank.
    8. Aline Coudouel & Stefano Paternostro, 2006. "Analyzing the Distributional Impact of Reforms : A Practitioner’s Guide to Pension, Health, Labor Markets, Public Sector Downsizing, Taxation, Decentralization, and Macroeconomic Modeling, Volume 2," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7041.
    9. Essama-Nssah, B., 2005. "The poverty and distributional impact of macroeconomic shocks and policies : a review of modeling approaches," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3682, The World Bank.
    10. AfDB AfDB, 2006. "Working Paper 86 - A Review of Ex - ante Poverty Impact Assessments of Macroeconomic Policies in Cameroon and Ghana," Working Paper Series 2220, African Development Bank.
    11. Banks, Nicola, 2011. "Improving Donor Support for Urban Poverty Reduction," WIDER Working Paper Series 068, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Stifel, David C. & Randrianarisoa, Jean-Claude, 2006. "Agricultural policy in Madagascar: A seasonal multi-market model," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 28(9), pages 1023-1027, December.

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