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The Role of Human Capital Within the University Administration

Author

Listed:
  • Fakhraddin Maroofi

    (Department of management, university of Kurdistan, Sanandaj, Iran)

  • Seyed Hamid Mahdiun

    (PhD Student of management, Shakhes Pajooh institute of Isfahan)

  • Jamshid Taghsimi

    (Shakhes Pajooh institute of Isfahan)

Abstract

Administrative ability is important to structure, effectiveness. Yet, few studies check, however, human capital investments over a career have an effect on choice into administration. We tend to use panel knowledge for economists to estimate the choice of an administration over a pure tutorial track. The results show that, since research-specific human capital reduces to make a choice changing into an administrator, general human capital will increase it. There are inferior administrative opportunities for women that haven?t improved over time and variation within the role of human capital per institutional analysis mission. Thus, our results suggest tutorial leaders don?t seem to a just born, however cultivated through their human capital investments.

Suggested Citation

  • Fakhraddin Maroofi & Seyed Hamid Mahdiun & Jamshid Taghsimi, 2017. "The Role of Human Capital Within the University Administration," International Journal of Asian Social Science, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 7(2), pages 169-181, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:asi:ijoass:2017:p:169-181
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Graves, Philip E & Marchand, James R & Thompson, Randal, 1982. "Economics Departmental Rankings: Research Incentives, Constraints, and Efficiency," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(5), pages 1131-1141, December.
    2. Sharon M. Oster & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1998. "Aging And Productivity Among Economists," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(1), pages 154-156, February.
    3. Hansen, W Lee & Weisbrod, Burton A & Strauss, Robert P, 1978. "Modeling the Earnings and Research Productivity of Academic Economists," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(4), pages 729-741, August.
    4. John M. McDowell & Larry D. Singell Jr. & James P. Ziliak, 2001. "Gender and Promotion in the Economics Profession," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(2), pages 224-244, January.
    5. Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1999. "Adam Smith Goes to College: An Economist Becomes an Academic Administrator," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 99-116, Winter.
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