IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/asi/aeafrj/2019p52-63.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Does Really Economic Freedom Matter for Growth in South Asia? Empirical Evidences from Pre-Economic Crises and Post-Economic Crises Period

Author

Listed:
  • Muhammad Nadeem

    (School of International Trade and Economics University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, PR China)

  • Yang Jun

    (School of International Trade and Economics University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, PR China)

  • Tahseen Akhtar

    (Professor, School of International Trade and Economic, University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, PR China)

  • Wanlu Dong

    (Research Scholar, University of Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan)

  • Momna Niazi

    (School of International Trade and Economics University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, PR China)

Abstract

The discussion about the relationship between economic freedom and economic growth is not new and has always been extensively discussed in economic literature. But the question in this area is the consideration of the effects of global financial crises of 2008. This study attempts to answer the question: How does economic crises effect freedom-growth nexus? This study analyses the relationship between economic freedom index (measured by Fraser Institute), individual components of economic freedom and GDP per capita growth of 5 South Asian countries over the period of 1990-2015. Fixed effects regression results reveals that GDP per capita growth is positively affected by economic freedom index and this relationship has weakened by the global economic crises of 2008. It does not mean that increasing economic freedom is good for economic growth since one of the components of economic freedom has negative effect on growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Muhammad Nadeem & Yang Jun & Tahseen Akhtar & Wanlu Dong & Momna Niazi, 2019. "Does Really Economic Freedom Matter for Growth in South Asia? Empirical Evidences from Pre-Economic Crises and Post-Economic Crises Period," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 9(1), pages 52-63, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:asi:aeafrj:2019:p:52-63
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aessweb.com/download.php?id=4449
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.aessweb.com/journals/5002/January2019
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2006. "Estimation and Inference in Large Heterogeneous Panels with a Multifactor Error Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(4), pages 967-1012, July.
    2. Carlsson, Fredrik & Lundstrom, Susanna, 2002. "Economic Freedom and Growth: Decomposing the Effects," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 112(3-4), pages 335-344, September.
    3. Robert J. Barro, 1998. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262522543, September.
    4. de Haan, Jakob & Sturm, Jan-Egbert, 2000. "On the relationship between economic freedom and economic growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 215-241, June.
    5. Gwartney, James D, 1970. "Discrimination and Income Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(3), pages 396-408, June.
    6. James D. Gwartney & Randall G. Holcombe & Robert A. Lawson, 2006. "Institutions and the Impact of Investment on Growth," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(2), pages 255-273, May.
    7. Pesaran, M.H., 2004. "‘General Diagnostic Tests for Cross Section Dependence in Panels’," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0435, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    8. Psacharopoulos, George, 1994. "Returns to investment in education: A global update," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 1325-1343, September.
    9. Jac C. Heckelman, 2000. "Economic Freedom and Economic Growth: A Short-run Causal Investigation," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 3, pages 71-91, May.
    10. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    11. de Haan, Jakob & Siermann, Clemens L J, 1998. "Further Evidence on the Relationship between Economic Freedom and Economic Growth," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 95(3-4), pages 363-380, June.
    12. Heckelman, Jac C. & Stroup, Michael D., 2005. "A comparison of aggregation methods for measures of economic freedom," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 953-966, December.
    13. De Vanssay, Xavier & Spindler, Z A, 1994. "Freedom and Growth: Do Constitutions Matter?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 78(3-4), pages 359-372, March.
    14. Hossein Panahi & Ahmad Assadzadeh & Ramiar Refaei, 2014. "Economic Freedom and Economic Growth in Mena Countries," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(1), pages 105-116, January.
    15. Levin, Andrew & Lin, Chien-Fu & James Chu, Chia-Shang, 2002. "Unit root tests in panel data: asymptotic and finite-sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-24, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Jakob De Haan & Susanna Lundström & Jan‐Egbert Sturm, 2006. "Market‐oriented institutions and policies and economic growth: A critical survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(2), pages 157-191, April.
    2. Renato Santiago & José Alberto Fuinhas & António Cardoso Marques, 2020. "The impact of globalization and economic freedom on economic growth: the case of the Latin America and Caribbean countries," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 61-85, February.
    3. Falguni Pattanaik & Narayan Nayak, 2014. "Economic freedom and economic growth in India: What is the empirical relationship?," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 275-298, November.
    4. Sayari, Naz & Sari, Ramazan & Hammoudeh, Shawkat, 2018. "The impact of value added components of GDP and FDI on economic freedom in Europe," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 282-294.
    5. Richard J. Cebula, 2013. "Budget Deficits, Economic Freedom, and Economic Growth in OECD Nations: P2SLS Fixed-Effects Estimates, 2003–2008," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 28(Spring 20), pages 75-96.
    6. Erdem Ekrem & Tugcu Can Tansel, 2012. "New Evidence on the Relationship Between Economic Freedom and Growth: A Panel Cointegration Analysis for The Case of OECD," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 12(3), pages 1-18, September.
    7. Berggren, Niclas, 2003. "The Benefits of Economic Freedom: A Survey," Ratio Working Papers 4, The Ratio Institute.
    8. Nicholas Apergis & Oguzhan Dincer & James E. Payne, 2014. "Economic Freedom And Income Inequality Revisited: Evidence From A Panel Error Correction Model," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(1), pages 67-75, January.
    9. Martin Rode & Sebastian Coll, 2012. "Economic freedom and growth. Which policies matter the most?," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 95-133, June.
    10. Cem Ertur & Antonio Musolesi, 2017. "Weak and Strong Cross‐Sectional Dependence: A Panel Data Analysis of International Technology Diffusion," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(3), pages 477-503, April.
    11. Mao, Guangyu & Shen, Yan, 2019. "Bubbles or fundamentals? Modeling provincial house prices in China allowing for cross-sectional dependence," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 53-64.
    12. Mehmet Mercan & Ozlem Azer, 2013. "The Relationship between Economic Growth and Income Distribution in Turkey and the Turkish Republics of Central Asia and Caucasia: Dynamic Panel Data Analysis with Structural Breaks," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 3(2), pages 165-182, December.
    13. Felipa de Mello-Sampayo & Sofia de Sousa-Vale, 2014. "Financing Health Care Expenditure in the OECD Countries: Evidence from a Heterogeneous, Cross-Sectional Dependent Panel," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 61(2), pages 207-225, March.
    14. Olufemi Adewale Aluko & Olufemi Patrick Adeyeye & Patrick Olajide Oladele, 2020. "Finance–growth nexus in sub-Saharan Africa revisited: evidence based on a new composite index," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 53(2), pages 333-355, May.
    15. Arouri, Mohamed El Hedi & Ben Youssef, Adel & M'henni, Hatem & Rault, Christophe, 2012. "Energy consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in Middle East and North African countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 342-349.
    16. Çetin, Ahmet Burak, 2019. "The Effect of Economic and Political Institutions on Economic Growth: The Case of Developed Countries and Emerging Market Economies," Bulletin of Economic Theory and Analysis, BETA Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 1-31, December.
    17. Muhammad Ali & Uwe Cantner & Ipsita Roy, 2016. "Knowledge spillovers through FDI and trade: the moderating role of quality-adjusted human capital," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 837-868, October.
    18. Holly, Sean & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Yamagata, Takashi, 2010. "A spatio-temporal model of house prices in the USA," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 158(1), pages 160-173, September.
    19. Bittencourt, Manoel, 2011. "Inflation and financial development: Evidence from Brazil," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 91-99, January.
    20. R. Golinelli & I. Mammi & A. Musolesi, 2018. "Parameter heterogeneity, persistence and cross-sectional dependence: new insights on fiscal policy reaction functions for the Euro area," Working Papers wp1120, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:asi:aeafrj:2019:p:52-63. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chan Hoi Yan). General contact details of provider: http://www.aessweb.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.