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Gender Analysis of Malnutrition: A Case Study of School-Going Children in Bahawalpur

Author

Listed:
  • Tasnim Khan

    (Associate Professor, Department of Economics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur, Pakistan)

  • Rana Ejaz Ali Khan

    (Associate Professor and Chairman, Department of Economics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur, Pakistan)

  • Muhammad Ali Raza

    (Research Assistant at Center for Business and Economics Research, Institute of Business Administration, Karachi, Pakistan)

Abstract

The literature confirmed the existence of gender discrimination in children?s health, nutrition and education in South Asia. This study examines, whether there are sex differences in stunting and wasting among schooling-going children (5-14 years) and how they are affected by socioeconomic factors. A sample of 684 school-going children of both sexes (376 male children and 308 female children) was selected randomly from different schools of both urban and rural areas of Bahawalpur. Weight and height were taken according to anthropometric measurements. The nutritional indices of World Health Organization (WHO) and the Center for Disease Control (CDC) were used as nutritional standards. The stunting and wasting rates were found 10.1 and 15.2 percent for males and 15.2 and 25 percent for female children respectively. The binary logistic regression for two indices of malnutrition, i.e. wasting and stunting were run separately for male children and female children to determine gender discrimination in nutritional status of children. The probability of being stunted and wasted by increase in age was found significantly lower for females as compared to male children. The male and female children of nuclear households have higher probability to be stunted and wasted respectively but the effect has been found more severe for female children. Mother?s education emerged as one of the most important variables which decrease the probability of stunting for both male and female children. The effect is found more favorable for male as compared to female children. Household income status and living condition index has shown no significant effect on probability of malnutrition of male and female children.

Suggested Citation

  • Tasnim Khan & Rana Ejaz Ali Khan & Muhammad Ali Raza, 2015. "Gender Analysis of Malnutrition: A Case Study of School-Going Children in Bahawalpur," Asian Development Policy Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(2), pages 29-48, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:asi:adprev:2015:p:29-48
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Marito Garcia & Harold Alderman, 1989. "Patterns and Determinants of Malnutrition in Children in Pakistan: Impact of Community Health," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 891-902.
    2. Rana Ejaz Ali Khan, 2008. "Gender Analysis of Children’s Activities in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 47(2), pages 169-195.
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    8. Ukwuani, Festus A. & Suchindran, Chirayath M., 2003. "Implications of women's work for child nutritional status in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study of Nigeria," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 56(10), pages 2109-2121, May.
    9. Aturupane, Harsha & Deolalikar, Anil B. & Gunewardena, Dileni, 2008. "The Determinants of Child Weight and Height in Sri Lanka: A Quantile Regression Approach," WIDER Working Paper Series 053, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    10. Rana Ejaz Ali Khan & Toseef Azid, 2011. "Malnutrition in primary school-age children: A case of urban and slum areas of Bahawalpur, Pakistan," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(9), pages 748-766, August.
    11. Alain Marcoux, 2002. "Sex Differentials in Undernutrition: A Look at Survey Evidence," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(2), pages 275-284.
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