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The Effect of Macroeconomic Variables on the Inflow of Remittance in Bangladesh

Author

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  • Naheem Mahtab

    (School of Business Independent University, Bangladesh)

Abstract

Bangladesh is one of the biggest remittances receiving country in this world and maintains this status from several years. This amount is about 12% of GDP and more than half of total export earnings. According to a World Bank Report Bangladesh is amongst the top ten nations which receive huge amount of remittances from abroad and for this Bangladesh’s foreign exchange reserve has significantly gone up in 2013.In the last several years, Bangladesh’s foreign exchange reserve continued to puff up crossing the $16-billion mark. Furthermore, if the total amount of money that is remitted through informal channels is also taken into account, the total amount of remittance that is received in Bangladesh will soar up to higher magnitudes. The major source of remittance inflow in Bangladesh is the from the Middle Eastern countries. As noted by an official associated with labor migration, "remittances have been causing a silent economic revolution in Bangladesh.” The country is expected to receive $15.05 billion in 2014, enough to retain theeighth position it held last year, says the WB's Migration and Remittance Unit.

Suggested Citation

  • Naheem Mahtab, 2015. "The Effect of Macroeconomic Variables on the Inflow of Remittance in Bangladesh," Economy, Asian Online Journal Publishing Group, vol. 2(1), pages 21-31.
  • Handle: RePEc:aoj:econom:2015:p:21-31
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    References listed on IDEAS

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