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Pakistan’s Monetary Aid Concerns

Author

Listed:
  • Muhammad Nayaz
  • Javed Husain

    () (Iqra University
    Iqra University)

Abstract

Aid is unlikely to encourage the development and growth of the countries affected from natural disasters. This study scrutinizes that it is not necessary that every commitment has to be fulfilled. As in this research, it is found that the level of commitment of aid for the flood affected country of Pakistan was quite higher than the level of aid actually provided by allied-countries of Pakistan. Ironically so many countries have only made commitments for aid, just to prove on media that they are responsive and deeply concerned but in real they were observed not responsive and responsible while fulfilling their promises for catering the human welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Muhammad Nayaz & Javed Husain, 2013. "Pakistan’s Monetary Aid Concerns," South Asian Journal of Management Sciences (SAJMS), Iqra University, Iqra University, vol. 7(1), pages 31-34, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:ajm:journl:v:7:y:2013:i:1:p:31-34
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    File URL: http://sajms.iurc.edu.pk/issues/2013a/Spring2013V7N1P4.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. C-J. Dalgaard & H. Hansen, 2001. "On Aid, Growth and Good Policies," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(6), pages 17-41.
    2. David Roodman, 2007. "The Anarchy of Numbers: Aid, Development, and Cross-Country Empirics," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 255-277, May.
    3. Larrú, José María, 2010. "Foreign Aid in Equatorial Guinea: Macroeconomic Features and Future Challenges," MPRA Paper 25001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Pablo Selaya, 2005. "To aid or not to aid: Foreign aid and productivity in cross-country regressions," Development Research Working Paper Series 03/2005, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
    5. Armah, Stephen E. & Nelson, Carl H., 2008. "Is Foreign Aid Beneficial for Sub-Saharan Africa? A Panel Data Analysis," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6356, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Henry, Peter B. & Arslanalp, Serkan, 2003. "Helping the Poor to Help Themselves: Debt Relief or Aid?," Research Papers 1838, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    7. Muhammed Islam, 2005. "Regime changes, economic policies and the effect of aid on growth," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(8), pages 1467-1492.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary aid; friend-countries.;

    JEL classification:

    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid

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