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Private irrigation investment in Colombia: effects of violence, macroeconomic policy, and environmental conditions

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  • Dinar, Ariel
  • Keck, Andrew

Abstract

This paper identifies and estimates the effects of several determinants on private investment in irrigation in Colombia. It attempts to quantify macroeconomic policy, environment, and violence variables that have been identified in previous studies as significantly affecting investment in agriculture in general, and in irrigation in particular. Variables such as violence, climate, and governmental price and credit policies are used to explain changes in private investment in irrigation across regions and over time. Violence negatively affects private investment. Climate affects the investment such that in regions with favorable climate conditions, investment in irrigation is less attractive, and appropriate government crop-price and credit policies promote investment in irrigation.

Suggested Citation

  • Dinar, Ariel & Keck, Andrew, 1997. "Private irrigation investment in Colombia: effects of violence, macroeconomic policy, and environmental conditions," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 16(1), March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaaeaj:174040
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dinar, Ariel & Yaron, Dan, 1992. "Adoption and abandonment of irrigation technologies," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 6(4), pages 315-332, April.
    2. Cardoso, Eliana, 1993. "Private Investment in Latin America," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(4), pages 833-848, July.
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    4. Dinar, Ariel & Yaron, Dan, 1992. "Adoption and abandonment of irrigation technologies," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 6(4), April.
    5. Morrison, Andrew R, 1993. "Violence of Economics: What Drives Internal Migration in Guatemala?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(4), pages 817-831, July.
    6. Binswanger, Hans P. & Khandker, Shahidur R. & Rosenzweig, Mark R., 1993. "How infrastructure and financial institutions affect agricultural output and investment in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 337-366, August.
    7. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1992. "A Sensitivity Analysis of Cross-Country Growth Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 942-963, September.
    8. Negri, Donald H. & Brooks, Douglas H., 1990. "Determinants Of Irrigation Technology Choice," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 15(02), December.
    9. Ariel Dinar & Mark Campbell & David Zilberman, 1992. "Adoption of improved irrigation and drainage reduction technologies under limiting environmental conditions," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 2(4), pages 373-398, July.
    10. Musalem, Alberto R., 1989. "Private investment in Mexico : an empirical analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 183, The World Bank.
    11. Wheeler, David, 1984. "Sources of stagnation in sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 1-23, January.
    12. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. María A. González & Rigoberto A. Lopez, 2007. "Political Violence and Farm Household Efficiency in Colombia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55, pages 367-392.
    2. Brauer, J & Gomez-Sorzano, A.G., 2004. "Homicide Cycles in Colombia," International Journal of Applied Econometrics and Quantitative Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 1(1), pages 29-50.
    3. Brauer, Jurgen & Gomez-Sorzano, Alejandro & Sethuraman, Sankar, 2004. "Decomposing violence: political murder in Colombia, 1946-1999," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 447-461, June.
    4. Verteramo Chiu, Leslie J. & Turvey, Calum G., 2015. "Perception and Action in a Conflict Zone: a Study of Rural Economy and Rural Life amidst Narcos in Northeastern Mexico," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205447, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    5. Goldsmith, Peter D. & Gunjal, Kisan & Ndarishikanye, Barnabe, 2004. "Rural-urban migration and agricultural productivity: the case of Senegal," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 33-45, July.
    6. Gomez-Sorzano, Gustavo, 2006. "The econometrics of violence, terrorism and scenarios for peace in Colombia from 1950 to 2019," MPRA Paper 539, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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