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Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon

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  • Gladwin, Christina H.

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, development experts and donor agencies have agreed on the importance of structural adjustment programs (SAPs) aimed at 'getting prices right'. Adoption of reforms were made preconditions for new loans or grants in many sub-Saharan African countries. In both Malawi and Cameroon, one such required reform was government's eliminating fertilizer subsidies to the small farm sector, previously used to increase the profitability of intensive agriculture while keeping food prices artificially low. The aim of this ,:>aper is to review fertilizer subsidy removal programs for their impact on farmers, who in sub-Saharan Africa are women. In theory, SAP programs should benefit women producers, because much emphasis is placed on renewing agricultural production and aligning farmgate prices with world prices. But in practice, will they benefit? Are SAPs gender-neutral and affect men and women equally, or merely gender-blind?

Suggested Citation

  • Gladwin, Christina H., 1992. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 7(2), July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaaeaj:172954
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/172954
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lele, Uma, 1990. "Structural adjustment, agricultural development and the poor: Some lessons from the Malawian experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 18(9), pages 1207-1219, September.
    2. Timmer, C. Peter, 1974. "The Demand for Fertilizer in Developing Countries," Food Research Institute Studies, Stanford University, Food Research Institute, issue 03.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gladwin, Christina H. & Thomson, Anne M. & Peterson, Jennifer S. & Anderson, Andrea S., 2001. "Addressing food security in Africa via multiple livelihood strategies of women farmers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 177-207, April.
    2. Carr, Edward R., 2008. "Men's Crops and Women's Crops: The Importance of Gender to the Understanding of Agricultural and Development Outcomes in Ghana's Central Region," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 900-915, May.
    3. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Pandolfelli, Lauren, 2010. "Promising Approaches to Address the Needs of Poor Female Farmers: Resources, Constraints, and Interventions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 581-592, April.
    4. Doss, Cheryl R., 2001. "Designing Agricultural Technology for African Women Farmers: Lessons from 25 Years of Experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(12), pages 2075-2092, December.
    5. Gladwin, Christina H. & Peterson, Jennifer S. & Mwale, Abiud C., 2002. "The Quality of Science in Participatory Research: A Case Study from Eastern Zambia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 523-543, April.
    6. Reardon, Thomas & Kelly, Valerie A. & Yanggen, David & Crawford, Eric W., 1999. "Determinants Of Fertilizer Adoption By African Farmers: Policy Analysis Framework, Illustrative Evidence, And Implications," Staff Papers 11779, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Crawford, Eric W. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Kelly, Valerie A., 2005. "Alternative Approaches for Promoting Fertilizer Use in Africa, with Particular Reference to the Role of Fertilizer Subsidies," Staff Papers 11557, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    8. Doss, Cheryl R., 2002. "Men's Crops? Women's Crops? The Gender Patterns of Cropping in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 1987-2000, November.

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