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Household Food Demand in Burkina Faso: Implications for Food Policy

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  • Savadogo, Kimseyinga
  • Brandt, Jon A.

Abstract

Chronic food production deficits since the early 1970s have prompted policymakers of Burkina Faso to emphasize technological research with the goal of increasing the production of the mostconsumed locally-grown cereals: sorghum, millet and maize. Meanwhile, urban consumers have been developing preferences for rice and wheat, cereals that are primarily imported. This study estimates demand relationships among food items in Ouagadougou, Burkina. The results of the estimation suggest that prices, income, household composition, education, marital status and urbanization were jointly important in explaining household expenditure allocations. Both local and imported cereal consumption responded positively to an income increase. However, incremental income changes would lead to relatively greater consumption of locally produced cereals by lowincome households whereas high-income households would consume relatively more wheat and rice. The household model is then used to demonstrate its relevance in addressing food policy issues, by forecasting the levels of urban grain demand under alternative income and demographic scenarios. With increased production due to advances in technology, the urban demand levels do not exhaust the rural surplus of local cereals, but deficits persist in the rice-wheat sector. The results underscore the importance of technological research since Burkina could become self-sufficient in at least the production of sorghum, millet and maize.

Suggested Citation

  • Savadogo, Kimseyinga & Brandt, Jon A., 1988. "Household Food Demand in Burkina Faso: Implications for Food Policy," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(4), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaaeaj:172147
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Soe, T. & Batterham, Robert L. & Drynan, R.G., 1994. "Demand for food in Myanmar (Burma)," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 11(2-3), December.
    2. Akinleye, S.O. & Rahji, M.A.Y., 2007. "Nutrient elasticities among Nigerian households differentiated by income," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 46(2), June.
    3. Marcel Fafchamps & Forhad Shilpi, 2003. "The spatial division of labour in Nepal," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(6), pages 23-66.
    4. Jeffrey D. Vitale & John H. Sanders, 2005. "New markets and technological change for the traditional cereals in semiarid sub-Saharan Africa: the Malian case," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(2), pages 111-129, March.
    5. Abdulai, Awudu & Aubert, Dominique, 2004. "A cross-section analysis of household demand for food and nutrients in Tanzania," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 67-79, July.
    6. Weliwita, Ananda & Nyange, David & Tsujii, Hiroshi, 2003. "Food Demand Patterns in Tanzania: A Censored Regression Analysis of Microdata," Sri Lankan Journal of Agricultural Economics, Sri Lanka Agricultural Economics Association (SAEA), vol. 5.
    7. Teklu, T., 1996. "Food demand studies in Sub-Saharan Africa: a survey of empirical evidence," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 479-496, December.
    8. François Gardes & Noël Thiombiano, 2017. "The value of time and expenditures of rural households in Burkina Faso: a domestic production framework," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01535172, HAL.
    9. Traore, Togo M. & Fields, Deacue, 2016. "Households Demand for Staple Cereal Commodities in Burkina Faso," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 229989, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    10. Tambi, N. Emmanuel, 2001. "Analysis of household attitudes toward the purchase of livestock products and fish in Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 26(2), pages 135-147, November.
    11. François Gardes & Noël Thiombiano, 2017. "The value of time and expenditures of rural households in Burkina Faso: a domestic production framework," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 17027, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.

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