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Social Viability Roles of the Agricultural Sector in China

  • Weiming, Tian
  • Xiumei, Liu
  • Xia, Kang
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    This study assesses how the transfer of rural labor to non-farm sectors affects China's national economy and the role the agricultural sector plays with respect to rural-urban migration. Econometric models using official Chinese statistics are used to: evaluate the marginal productivities of rural labor in agriculture versus non-agriculture; identify determinants of rural labor transfer; and assess the socioeconomic impacts of these transfers. It is concluded that though agricultural growth stems problems relating to over-urbanization, there are significant economic costs and undesirable social consequences associated with under-urbanization. Gains brought about by flexibility in the transfer of rural labor to non rural labor include higher GDP and reduced discrepancies in living standards for rural and urban populations.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/12006
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    Article provided by Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division in its journal eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics.

    Volume (Year): 1 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:ejadef:12006
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    1. de Brauw, Alan & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott & Zhang, Linxiu & Zhang, Yigang, 2002. "The Evolution Of China'S Rural Labor Markets During The Reforms," Working Papers 11984, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    2. Zhang, Linxiu & Rozelle, Scott & Huang, Jikun, 2001. "Off-Farm Jobs and On-Farm Work in Periods of Boom and Bust in Rural China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 505-526, September.
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