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Globalization, Urbanization and Nutritional Change in the Developing World

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  • Mendez, Michelle A.
  • Popkin, Barry M.

Abstract

Urbanization and globalization may enhance access to non traditional foods as a result of changing prices and production practices, as well as trade and marketing practices. These forces have influenced dietary patterns throughout the developing world. Longitudinal case study data from China indicate that consumption patterns closely reflect changes in availability, and that potentially obesogenic dietary patterns are emerging, with especially large changes in rural areas with high levels of urban infrastructure and resources. Recent data on women from 36 developing countries illustrate that these dietary shifts may have implications for overweight/obesity in urban and rural settings. These data emphasize the importance of developing country policies that include preventive measures to minimize further adverse shifts in diet and activity, and risk of continued rises in overweight.

Suggested Citation

  • Mendez, Michelle A. & Popkin, Barry M., 2004. "Globalization, Urbanization and Nutritional Change in the Developing World," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 1(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ejadef:12001
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/12001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Haddad, Lawrence & Ruel, Marie T. & Garrett, James L., 1999. "Are Urban Poverty and Undernutrition Growing? Some Newly Assembled Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 1891-1904, November.
    2. Haddad, Lawrence James & Ruel, Marie T. & Garrett, James L., 1999. "Are urban poverty and undernutrition growing?," FCND discussion papers 63, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2004:94:3:433-434_5 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Regmi, Anita & Gehlhar, Mark, 2001. "Consumer Preferences and Concerns Shape Global Food Trade," Food Review: The Magazine of Food Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, vol. 24(3).
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    Cited by:

    1. Bergh, Andreas & Nilsson, Therese, 2010. "Good for Living? On the Relationship between Globalization and Life Expectancy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 1191-1203, September.
    2. Bergh, Andreas & Nilsson, Therese, 2014. "Is Globalization Reducing Absolute Poverty?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 42-61.
    3. Berggren, Niclas & Nilsson, Therese, 2015. "Globalization and the transmission of social values: The case of tolerance," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 371-389.
    4. Amjad Ali & Marc Audi, 2016. "The Impact of Income Inequality, Environmental Degradation and Globalization on Life Expectancy in Pakistan: An Empirical Analysis," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 4(4), pages 182-193, April.
    5. Bergh, Andreas & Nilsson, Therese, 2009. "Good for living? On the relation between globalization and life expectancy," Working Papers 2009:9, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    6. von Meyer-Höfer, Marie & Juarez Tijerino, Andrea Maria & Spiller, Achim, 2015. "Sustainable food consumption in China and India," Discussion Papers 198718, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    7. Pingali, Prabhu, 2007. "Westernization of Asian diets and the transformation of food systems: Implications for research and policy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 281-298, June.
    8. Jane Dixon, 2009. "From the imperial to the empty calorie: how nutrition relations underpin food regime transitions," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 26(4), pages 321-333, December.
    9. Cockx, Lara & De Weerdt, Joachim, 2016. "From Corn to Popcorn? Urbanization and food consumption in Sub-Sahara Africa: Evidence from rural-urban migrants in Tanzania," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 249270, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    10. Sonya K. Huffman & Marian Rizov, 2007. "The Rise of Obesity in Transition Economies: Theory and Evidence from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey," LICOS Discussion Papers 18507, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    11. Alberto, Gabriele & Schettino, Francesco, 2006. "Child Mortality In China And Vietnam In A Comparative Perspective," MPRA Paper 3987, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Dec 2006.
    12. Goryakin, Yevgeniy & Suhrcke, Marc, 2014. "Economic development, urbanization, technological change and overweight: What do we learn from 244 Demographic and Health Surveys?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 109-127.
    13. Kleemann, Linda, 2012. "Sustainable agriculture and food security in Africa: An overview," Kiel Working Papers 1812, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    14. Loh, Chung-Ping A. & Li, Qiang, 2013. "Peer effects in adolescent bodyweight: Evidence from rural China," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 35-44.
    15. Heather Congdon Fors, 2014. "Social Globalization and Child Labor: A Cross-country Analysis," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(2), pages 125-153, June.
    16. Wendy J. Umberger & Xiaobo He & Nicholas Minot & Hery Toiba, 2015. "Examining the Relationship between the Use of Supermarkets and Over-nutrition in Indonesia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(2), pages 510-525.
    17. Welander, Anna & Lyttkens, Carl Hampus & Nilsson, Therese, 2015. "Globalization, democracy, and child health in developing countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 136, pages 52-63.
    18. Sonya Huffman & Marian Rizov, 2010. "The Rise of Obesity in Transition: Theory and Empirical Evidence from Russia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(3), pages 574-594.
    19. Firestone, Rebecca & Punpuing, Sureeporn & Peterson, Karen E. & Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores & Gortmaker, Steven L., 2011. "Child overweight and undernutrition in Thailand: Is there an urban effect?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(9), pages 1420-1428, May.
    20. Congdon Fors, Heather, 2012. "Social Globalization and Child Labor," Working Papers in Economics 533, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    21. Huffman, Sonya K. & Rizov, Marian, 2007. "Determinants of obesity in transition economies: The case of Russia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 379-391, December.

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