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The Food Processing Industry, Globalization and Developing Countries

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  • Wilkinson, John

Abstract

Transformations in the food processing sectors of developing countries are increasingly seen as strategic from the point of view of export earnings, domestic industry restructuring and dietary issues. This article reviews a selection of the literature on these themes. It begins with a discussion of the main trends identifiable in the food processing industries of the three regional blocs of the developed world, since it is their combined impact that determines the complex patterns of globalization. There follows a discussion of the importance of non-traditional food processing exports by developing countries and the different interpretations to which it has given rise. The internal transformations of the food processing sector of developing countries under the combined impact of imports and FDI are then considered. We conclude with a discussion of the heterogeneous dynamic of food processing in developing countries and the different possibilities for strengthening the participation of small and medium enterprises.

Suggested Citation

  • Wilkinson, John, 2004. "The Food Processing Industry, Globalization and Developing Countries," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 1(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ejadef:11999
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11999
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hartwig de Haen & Kostas Stamoulis & Prakash Shetty & Prabhu Pingali, 2003. "The World Food Economy in the Twenty-first Century: Challenges for International Co-operation," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 21(5-6), pages 683-696, December.
    2. Thomas Reardon & C. Peter Timmer & Christopher B. Barrett & Julio Berdegué, 2003. "The Rise of Supermarkets in Africa, Asia, and Latin America," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1140-1146.
    3. Haddad, Lawrence & Ruel, Marie T. & Garrett, James L., 1999. "Are Urban Poverty and Undernutrition Growing? Some Newly Assembled Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 1891-1904, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Herforth, Nico & Theuvsen, Ludwig & Vásquez, Wilson & Wollni, Meike, 2015. "Understanding participation in modern supply chains under a social network perspective – evidence from blackberry farmers in the Ecuadorian Andes," Discussion Papers 197709, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    2. Stamoulis, Kostas G. & Pingali, Prabhu L. & Reardon, Thomas, 2006. "Impacts of Agrifood Market Transformation during Globalization on the Poor's Rural Nonfarm Employment: Lessons for Rural Business Development Programs," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25556, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Muhammad AFZAL & Maryam AYAZ, 2013. "Efficiency of Food Sector of Pakistan-A Dea Analysis," Asian Journal of Empirical Research, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(10), pages 1310-1330, October.
    4. Alessandro Olper & Valentina Raimondi, 2008. "Market Access Asymmetry in Food Trade," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 144(3), pages 509-537, October.
    5. Donatella Baiardi & Carluccio Bianchi & Eleonora Lorenzini, 2014. "Food competition in world markets: Some evidence from a panel data analysis of top exporting countries," DEM Working Papers Series 083, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
    6. Thomas Reardon & Kostas Stamoulis & Prabhu Pingali, 2007. "Rural nonfarm employment in developing countries in an era of globalization," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(s1), pages 173-183, December.
    7. Reardon, Thomas, 2011. "The global rise and impact of supermarkets: an international perspective," Conference Proceedings 2011 125312, Crawford Fund.
    8. Salman Hyder & P.K. Bhargava, 2016. "Indian food processing industry - opportunities and challenges," International Journal of Economics and Business Research, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 11(1), pages 1-10.
    9. Reardon, Thomas & Barrett, Christopher B. & Berdegué, Julio A. & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2009. "Agrifood Industry Transformation and Small Farmers in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 1717-1727, November.
    10. Matoti, Bongiswa & Vink, Nick & Bienabe, Estelle, 2008. "Changing Face of the Agri-Food Market: A Farmers Response and Possible Solutions from a Provincial Perspective," 2007 Second International Conference, August 20-22, 2007, Accra, Ghana 52098, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).

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