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The Adoption and Impact of Improved Maize and Land Management Technologies in Uganda

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  • Sserunkuuma, Dick

Abstract

In spite of the fact that the Ugandan National Agricultural Research System has developed and released several production-enhancing technologies over a century, yields of most major crops at the farm level have been low. Given that about 80 percent of Uganda’s labor force is employed in agriculture, the scope for sustainable poverty reduction in Uganda depends very much on improving agricultural productivity. It is in this context, this paper examines why there has been poor adoption of production-enhancing technologies in the production of maize, which is a major crop in Uganda and what the impacts of the exiting production environment are on factor payments. This study reveals that farmers do not pay proper attention to soil fertility management, which acts as a major constraint to increase yields. The analysis also indicates the need for vibrant rental market for land to provide access to landless tenants who are found to be the economically efficient.

Suggested Citation

  • Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2005. "The Adoption and Impact of Improved Maize and Land Management Technologies in Uganda," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 2(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ejadef:110145
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/110145
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Otsuka, Keijiro & Place, Frank, 2001. "Land tenure and natural resource management," Food policy statements 34, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Wood, Stanley & Sebastian, Kate & Nachtergaele, Freddy & Nielsen, Daniel & Dai, Aiguo, 1999. "Spatial aspects of the design and targeting of agricultural development strategies:," EPTD discussion papers 44, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Sesmero, Juan P. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob E. & Cook, Aaron M., 2015. "How do African Farm Households Adapt to Climate Change? A Structural Analysis from Malawi," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212688, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Coromaldi, Manuela & Pallante, Giacomo & Savastano, Sara, 2015. "Adoption of modern varieties, farmers' welfare and crop biodiversity: Evidence from Uganda," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 346-358.
    3. Christina Handschuch & Meike Wollni, 2016. "Improved production systems for traditional food crops: the case of finger millet in western Kenya," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(4), pages 783-797, August.
    4. Kasirye, Ibrahim, 2013. "Constraints to Agricultural Technology Adoption in Uganda: Evidence from the 2005/06-2009/10 Uganda National Panel Survey," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(2), August.
    5. Alice Turinawe & Lars Drake & Johnny Mugisha, 2015. "Adoption intensity of soil and water conservation technologies: a case of South Western Uganda," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 711-730, August.
    6. Jia, Xiangping, 2009. "Synergistic Green and White Revolution: Evidence from Kenya and Uganda," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51367, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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